Tag Archives: Featured

Musang Little Wildcats Cooking Classes Teach Kids About Filipinx Culture and Language Through Food

by Mark Van Streefkerk 


For Chef Melissa Miranda, Musang has always been more than a restaurant. The popular popup found a permanent home in North Beacon Hill at the beginning of this year, and through the crisis of COVID-19, pivoted to a community kitchen as well as restaurant, offering free or pay-what-you-can meals during the pandemic. Musang is one of seven restaurants and popups that form the Seattle Kitchen Collective, a grassroots collective of like-minded chefs who provide meals for community members who need them. Now through Little Wildcats cooking classes, Miranda, Chef Amelia Franada, and Chef Marizel Yuen are sharing Filipinx culture with the youngest in the community.  

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Ask a Therapist: Want to Help Your Frustrated Kids Survive This Hell Year? Try Encouraging Their Meltdowns

by Liz Covey, LMHC


Question: Help! Lazy monsters have taken over my house! In other words, my kids aren’t doing so good. All they ever want to do is play video games or watch YouTube. When I ask them to do something like a chore, or even their homework, they bite my head off. What can we do to make it through this long winter?

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Sunday Comix: Seattle Exit Interview

by Brett Hamil


You can now order “Modest Incremental Change NOW,” a collection of my Sunday Comix spanning the entire messed-up summer of revolution, copaganda and liberal cooption in Seattle. Order your copy at: https://bretthamil.bigcartel.com/


Brett Hamil is a writer, cartoonist and performer living on the South End of Seattle. He produces the weekly comedy show Joketellers Union and the political comedy talk show The Seattle Process. The Seattle Weekly (RIP) once called him “the city’s premier political comic.”

Fired NY Amazon Employee Leads Black Friday Protests at Seattle Amazon HQ

by Ronnie Estoque


“If we don’t get it, shut it down!” was among the shouts that rang through the streets of downtown Seattle yesterday as Christian Smalls led a Black Friday protest against Amazon. Smalls, a five-year employee of the Seattle-based online retail giant, was fired in March of this year for speaking out about workers contracting COVID-19 at an Amazon warehouse in Staten Island, New York. 

Smalls, who since has become an outspoken critic of Amazon’s labor practices, formed his own organization called The Congress of Essential Workers (T.C.O.E.W.) to raise awareness about Amazon’s widely reported labor practices. During the pandemic he led a protest of about 50 Amazon workers to urge the company to close down the Staten Island facility after positive cases of COVID-19 were made public. He was then fired by Amazon following the protest, and on November 12, decided to file a class action lawsuit against the company for a termination he views as unjustified.

“They [Amazon] took away the hazard pay back in June; they took away the unlimited paid time off, and people are still contracting this virus,” Smalls said. “They [Amazon workers] deserve a pay increase; essential workers should be paid as a necessity.” 

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Two Healthcare Workers Describe Their Fever Journeys With COVID-19

by Sally James


Federico Olivas and Julian Perez are both dancers in the same folk group, Bailadores de Bronce, that celebrates Mexican traditions. They both work in healthcare. And in recent weeks, both survived COVID-19. For each of them, this past Thanksgiving included an extra helping of gratitude.

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OPINION: Washington Can’t Wait for Affordable Housing

by Ben Mitchell


In 1990 Washington State passed the Growth Management Act to help our cities and counties accommodate rapid growth while protecting what makes our state a great place to live: vibrant and diverse cities, beautiful wilderness and coastal areas, and working farmland.

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WEEKEND READS: Why Older People Tend to Have More Serious Cases of COVID-19

by Kevin Schofield


This week’s “long reads” has just one topic, but two related papers worth reading. Scientists now have a very good idea why older people tend to have more serious cases of COVID-19. And there are some very important implications of this, which we can take action on today.

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PHOTO ESSAY: CD Traffic Box Art, by Desmond Hansen, Honors Black Seattle Icons

by Susan Fried

If you’ve recently driven in the Central District, you may have noticed some new, colorful portraits appearing on traffic signal boxes at important neighborhood intersections. Artists or organizations can submit applications for permits to paint signal boxes online through the Seattle Department of Transportation services portal. The art program began in 2009 and has resulted in the transformation of hundreds of gray uninspiring boxes all over Seattle to beautiful artistic expressions by artists and community groups. 

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Che Sehyun’s ‘The Future Ancient’ Embraces Culture Without Borders

by Beverly Aarons


Certain human qualities are innate: the suckling instinct of a newborn baby, eating when hungry, drinking when thirsty, a reflexive kick when your knee is thumped. But there are other human qualities that only emerge through collective agreement, or what we call culture: the belief in individualism or the nuclear family, the desire to eat poultry instead of insects, the preference for a hike in the woods or a Saturday night watching football. Beyond the surface, culture shapes the way human groups (and individuals) view the world and their place in it.

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OPINION: Becoming a Good Ancestor

by Colleen Echohawk 


The elders always have something to teach us. Sometimes I am so busy, worried, and stressed that I miss it. I miss their quiet and unassuming teaching steeped in hard years of experience that gently guides us.  Recently, I stood outside of the Chief Seattle Club at a table, watching the line of relatives who have been experiencing homelessness; they were waiting for us to open the food line. The line was expansive, reaching all the way down the block. This population already struggles with food insecurity, but the pandemic has worsened an already tragic situation. Hundreds of our homeless relatives were hungry, waiting for our staff at the Chief Seattle Club to bring out nutritious and delicious meals to quell their hunger and offer kind words of support and comfort in an unsupportive and incredibly uncomfortable situation.

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