Tag Archives: Featured

OPINION: The Mythology of the Highly Capable

by Lola E. Peters

1988. His name was Tim. He graduated from Harvard at 16 and was working on his Masters. The law firm hired him to create a team and manage the transition from a mainframe system to desktop computing. Six months into his tenure everyone hated him, even the staff he had hired. Sure of his technical prowess and bolstered by decades of being the smartest person in the room, he was condescending to everyone. In his eyes, his solutions were always right, regardless of the actual outcomes. The human frailties and foibles of his colleagues and coworkers were liabilities to be fought against and conquered. Continue reading OPINION: The Mythology of the Highly Capable

Farming For Change: Native Women’s Legacy of Sustainability

by Sharon H. Chang

Girls and women, Indigenous people and land practices, and small organic farms are among the top solutions to ending climate change. Yet women and gender diverse people have almost no voice on big agribusiness boards while people of color are often rendered entirely voiceless as America’s sustainable food movement, dominated by white people, ignores the food, climate, and environmental injustices faced by communities of color. In this special Emerald series, photographer and writer Sharon H. Chang introduces the women and nonbinary farmers of color at the heart of Washington’s agrarian revival movement who are moving the needle towards not only a future livable planet, but a socially just one. 

It is estimated up to 29 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions come from unsustainable food systems, a big chunk of which comes from large-scale, mono-cropping farms in the global north. According to a comprehensive report released by the United Nations, combatting climate change will require major changes to management of farmland and food. Project Drawdown, a research organization that identifies the most viable solutions to the current climate crisis, asserts it will mean valuing Indigenous wisdom and farming. Why? Because Indigenous people, who have been stewarding the land since time immemorial, have been practicing and developing sustainable agriculture for thousands of years. Continue reading Farming For Change: Native Women’s Legacy of Sustainability

Q&A: Student, Author and Activist Azure Savage Discusses Racism and Centering Students of Color at Seattle Public Schools

by Guy Oron

Azure Savage is an author, activist and senior at Garfield High School. Savage recently published You Failed Us: Students of Color Talk Seattle Schools, a memoir and oral history of his and 40 other students of color’s experiences with racism in the Seattle Public Schools district. The book confronts Seattle’s education system and shows how programs, such as the advanced learning program, harm students of color. Continue reading Q&A: Student, Author and Activist Azure Savage Discusses Racism and Centering Students of Color at Seattle Public Schools

Ask a Therapist: Framing Limits for an Adolescent

Counselors Roy Fisher and Liz Covey answer readers’ questions for South Seattle Emerald’s “Ask A Therapist.” Have a question about a relationship? Wondering about the struggles of being a parent? Others likely have the same questions and Covey and Fisher bring years of professional experience to provide their insights. Continue reading Ask a Therapist: Framing Limits for an Adolescent

THIS WEEK IN SOUTH SEATTLE — TINY COUCH Concerts, L.E.M.S. & Estelita’s Salsa & Sangria Party, Ayame Kai Guild’s Arts & Crafts Fair, and More!

by Emerald Staff

Wed., Nov. 20:

Brighter Future: To be heard To be seen To be free.

“Come see this exhibition organized by the Ethnic Heritage Art Gallery and featuring artworks created by more than 50 local artists of color reflecting on freedom. The exhibition is organized by the Ethnic Heritage Art Gallery (EHAG) Board, a collective of City of Seattle employees including people who are of Black, Latinx, Native, White, Asian, and Indian backgrounds who showcase local artists of color and build appreciation for diversity and social commentary expressed through art.

FREE and open to the public.

The exhibition features 100 artworks including paintings, photography, sculpture, print, video and four installations.Exhibit live through Jan. 11, 2020.

Time: 10 a.m.–6 p.m.
Where: ARTS at King Street Station — 303 S. Jackson St. (top floor)
Cost: FREE

Continue reading THIS WEEK IN SOUTH SEATTLE — TINY COUCH Concerts, L.E.M.S. & Estelita’s Salsa & Sangria Party, Ayame Kai Guild’s Arts & Crafts Fair, and More!

Air Quality Is Better Everywhere But The West. Blame Wildfires

by Katherine Long

(This story originally appeared in Bitterroot, an online magazine about the politics, economy, culture, and environment of the West.)

After wildfires ripped through California this fall, the plumes of smoke that enveloped the state underscored how millions of people living in the West are being exposed to air pollution. Climate change is likely to make fire and smoke problems worse. What that means for our health, though, is just starting to be understood by researchers. Continue reading Air Quality Is Better Everywhere But The West. Blame Wildfires

Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic to Open Second Location

By Carolyn Bick

When Marva Harris first adopted grandson Jeremiah in 2013, the then-infant’s tiny body was covered in eczema from head to toe. While a United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that it’s increasingly more common for Black children to suffer from the skin disease, Jeremiah was “in pretty bad shape.” Continue reading Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic to Open Second Location