Tag Archives: Featured

Aki Kurose Sending STEM Team to Prestigious Statewide Tech Competition

by Erin Okuno


Exciting things are happening at Aki Kurose Middle School. The sixth to eighth grade school, tucked between Rainier Ave and Martin Luther King Jr. Way, is sending their Technology Student Association (TSA) STEM Team to the state conference in March 2020. This is the fourth year the Aki Kurose team will be heading to the statewide competition. Continue reading Aki Kurose Sending STEM Team to Prestigious Statewide Tech Competition

In Seattle, grandmothers raising kids have to rely on each other

(This article originally appeared on Crosscut and has been reprinted with permission.)

For kinship caregivers raising another family member’s children, state support lags behind assistance for foster parents.

by Dorothy Edwards


At ages 69 and 71, Sadie Pimpleton and Gloria Johnson are both well into retirement. But instead of relaxing, the sisters are raising their grandchildren as their own.

Johnson is caring for two grandchildren, while Pimpleton is providing a home to three, including a 6-month-old. It is challenging, they say, but Pimpleton and Johnson have always counted on each other for support.

“I guess we are like each others right hand,” Pimpleton said.

The challenges grew in 2014 after Pimpleton’s husband of 43 years passed away, leaving her in a state of depression.

“Even though I had the grandkids, I would stay in and not go anywhere,” Pimpleton said.

It was during this low point that the family met Alesia Cannady and learned about her support group for grandparents raising their grandkids. Soon the sisters were attending a regular meetup called Pepper Pot, which was run by Cannady’s nonprofit Women United Seattle, mostly out of her Skyway home.

Continue reading In Seattle, grandmothers raising kids have to rely on each other

THIS WEEK IN SOUTH SEATTLE — Laugh Rehab, Lunar New Year at Wing Luke, CD Community Conversation, and More!

by Emerald Staff

Wed., Jan. 22:

Indigenous Reparation and Recognition in Seattle

“Seattle is one of the wealthiest and fastest-growing cities in the nation, but that growth has come often at the expense of the Indigenous people who first lived here. In a forthcoming piece in Bitterroot and the South Seattle Emerald, writer Marcus Harrison Green examines how Native citizens in Seattle are pushing for greater representation, and how non-Native Seattle residents and officials can improve the relationship with Indigenous residents of this traditional Coast Salish territory.

“Green joins us along with Fern Renville and Russell Brooks for a panel discussion moderated by Bitterroot editor Maggie Mertens, exploring ways the city can best recognize its Indigenous roots and residents, and whether reparations should be a component of that process.

“Russell Brooks (Southern Cheyenne) is the executive director of Red Eagle Soaring Native Youth Theatre in Seattle. Marcus Harrison Green is the publisher of the South Seattle Emerald [this publication]. Rachel Heaton (Muckleshoot) is the co-founder of Mazaska Talks, a tool that supports community divestment from banks that finance fossil fuel development. Maggie Mertens is the managing editor of Bitterroot magazine. Fern Renville (Dakota) is the CEO of SNAG Productions. Robin Little Wing Sigo is the director of the Suquamish Research & Strategic Development Department and a member of the Suquamish Tribal Council.

The piece our own Marcus Harrison Green wrote, From Si’ahl to Seattle: Does a Wealthy City Owe Its First Residents Reparations?, is live on our website now. Go read it! (Then go to this talk.)

Also consider attending another upcoming event, Calling All Allies to Stand with the Duwamish Tribe! Hosted by Real Rent Duwamish, this event is an opportunity to demonstrate that “ally” is a verb.

Time: 7:30 p.m. (doors at 6:30)
Where: Town Hall Seattle — 1119 8th Ave
Cost: $5 (FREE for Youth, 22 & under)

SeattleNativeFinal(1)
Image by Morgan Krieg (this image has been cropped to fit this space).

Continue reading THIS WEEK IN SOUTH SEATTLE — Laugh Rehab, Lunar New Year at Wing Luke, CD Community Conversation, and More!

Seattle’s New Campaign Finance Legislation, Explained

by Erica C Barnett


Seattle’s city council recently passed two significant new pieces of campaign finance legislation aimed at reducing the influence of big corporations like Amazon in local elections, with a third bill still ongoing revisions. The first bill bans contributions from “foreign-influenced” corporations; the second creates new disclosure requirements for political ads, and the third—which sponsor Lorena Gonzalez has said she will bring back once she returns from maternity leave this spring—would limit contributions to political groups to $5,000. Continue reading Seattle’s New Campaign Finance Legislation, Explained

Letter to Dr. King

by Georgia McDade

Dear Dr. King,

Your eyes are seeing and ears hearing what the Lord had in store for you. Your heart is full of what God had in store for you.

In the 52 years since your death much has happened.  One time I say you know all about what has transpired; other times I say I’m glad you were not here to see. One of the biggest inventions is the smartphone.  It is a massive computer that we hold in our hands. Its information is at our fingertips. The most amazing feature for me is the countless facts I can get in a few seconds. Continue reading Letter to Dr. King

From Si’ahl to Seattle: Does A Wealthy City Owe Its First Residents Reparations?

by Marcus Harrison Green


This story is published in collaboration with Bitterroot, an online magazine about the politics, economy, culture, and environment of the West.


When she speaks, Rachel Heaton’s ancestors flourish as they did for millennia, until the 1860s. They flow from longhouses grouped into villages scattered around 54,000 acres of lush marshes near Elliott Bay and the Cedar and Green Rivers. After hunting ducks on the tidelands and harvesting salmonberries in coastal forests, they assemble to feast on the largesse.

“Every time I give an acknowledgement, I intentionally ask people to reflect on what the land looked like — our villages, our people,” said Heaton, a 40-year-old activist of Duwamish lineage and an enrolled member of the Muckleshoot Indian Tribe. Continue reading From Si’ahl to Seattle: Does A Wealthy City Owe Its First Residents Reparations?

THIS WEEK IN SOUTH SEATTLE — South-End MLK Day Events, Vanishing Seattle Film Series, Mixed N’ Misidentified, and More!

by Emerald Staff

Thurs., Jan. 16:

Vanishing Seattle Film Series Launch: Wa Na Wari

“Vanishing Seattle is excited to launch its series of short films that take a deeper dive into the stories of legacy, resistance, and resilience behind the #VanishingSeattle hashtag!

“We are premiering with a film about Wa Na Wari – a 5th-generation Black-owned home in the Central District that creates space for Black ownership, possibility, and belonging through art, historic preservation, and connection.

“Come join us at the Wa Na Wari house for the film screening (directed by devon de Leña + Chimaera Bailey) — plus art, food, & community. The event will also feature music and performances by Yirim Seck and Ebo Barton. Learn more about WNW at www.wanawari.org.

“The Vanishing Seattle film project is supported, in part, by 4Culture/King County Lodging Tax and the Northwest Film Forum.All-ages

Time: 7–9 p.m.
Where: Wa Na Wari — 911 24th Ave
Cost: FREE

79216317_2597565696989369_5686902296110170112_n.jpg

Continue reading THIS WEEK IN SOUTH SEATTLE — South-End MLK Day Events, Vanishing Seattle Film Series, Mixed N’ Misidentified, and More!

After Stepping Down, RVC Founding ED Vu Le Reflects on Six Years of Collaborative Leadership and Capacity Building

by Eric Card and Stacy Nguyen

It’s a transition that Vu Le has been looking forward to — though he is quick to note that his days are just as busy as ever, just in a different way. Le’s calendar used to be packed with meetings, whether they be appointments with community leaders, funders, donors, other nonprofit executive director — or whether they were ardent reminders that he needed to give himself enough time to get to the airport and through security so that he didn’t miss flights that took him all over the country and the world to speak on the importance of building up powerful voices for grassroots and community-based organizations led by POCs . Continue reading After Stepping Down, RVC Founding ED Vu Le Reflects on Six Years of Collaborative Leadership and Capacity Building