Tag Archives: Features

The Legacy of the Turkey Bowl Week of Service Continues With the 8th Annual Event

by Troy Landrum Jr.


“I don’t ever want to be able to help, and not help.” Those words from Cortez Charles signify the foundation and the mission of the 8th Annual Turkey Bowl Week.

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Weekend Reads | Outdoor Walking — or Rolling — to Boost Creativity

by Kevin Schofield


It’s well known that there are plenty of health benefits to walking. People who walk regularly tend to live longer, and walking as exercise has been shown to improve several health indicators. Recently, it was also discovered that walking decreases the risk of dementia in one’s golden years.

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Myth Busting: Five Misconceptions About Homelessness We Need to Retire

by Lauren Duffy

(This article was originally published on Real Change and has been reprinted under an agreement.)


Homelessness remains a persistent problem in Seattle and King County. The region that houses some of the wealthiest men on the planet simultaneously has one of the largest populations of homeless people in the country. 

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Weekend Reads | Is Playing Video Games Good for Kids’ Brains?

by Kevin Schofield


Last weekend, I talked about the benefits for Black students of having a Black teacher, benefits that were proven in a long-term study of students in Tennessee. This weekend’s read is a result from another valuable long-term study, this time on children’s brain development. Called the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study, it recruited 11,880 children ages 9–10 from 21 sites across the United States and will look at how those kids’ experiences and their bodies’ changing biology affects their brain development over the following several years. Like the study on students, this one is likely to produce dozens, if not hundreds, of research papers with new discoveries.

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Poor People’s Campaign: Called to Lead — Part 3

by Chardonnay Beaver


In 1967, after fighting against Jim Crow segregation and winning many civil rights victories for Black and Brown Americans, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and many others called for a “revolution of values” in America.

The Poor People’s Campaign marks Dr. King’s philosophical shift from civil rights to human rights — demanding a new consciousness amid the threat of war, poverty, racial discrimination, and white supremacy. This inclusive fusion movement would unite all races through their commonality of struggle, to create solutions that would revolutionize American values.

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Weekend Reads | The Impact of Black Teachers on Black Students

by Kevin Schofield


Back in the 1990s, the state of Tennessee began a field experiment looking at the impact of class size in its elementary schools. Called Project STAR (Student-Teacher Achievement Ratio), it randomly assigned students to a certain teacher and classroom. It found, not surprisingly, that class size mattered a lot: Students in smaller classes did better (as measured by end-of-year test scores).

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D’Vonne Pickett Jr. — ‘Prolific, So Gifted!’

by Troy Landrum Jr.


“Prolific, so gifted!” Those are the first words we hear from the resounding lyrics of the late great Nipsey Hussle’s award-winning Victory Lap album. If you know of his life and work, you know exactly how impactful those words are to his legacy. If you don’t know, then it would be my honor to tell you. 

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On Oct. 31, Get Ready to Welcome … the New Normal!

by Ashley Archibald

(This article was originally published on Real Change and has been reprinted under an agreement.)


When an unmasked Gov. Jay Inslee announced the end of the coronavirus state of emergency after more than two years, he did so with matter-of-fact language. Language for a boardroom.

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Weekend Reads | Your Windshield May Have Important Data Splattered on It

by Kevin Schofield


Growing up in a rural area, as I did, one learns that a regular rite of summer is bugs getting smashed on your car windshield. There’s the odd one here and there, and then occasionally when driving by a field a swarm will cross the road and … well, it’s pretty disgusting. But over the past couple of decades, many people have started to notice that there don’t seem to be nearly as many flying insects as there used to be. At the same time, scientists have been gathering data that seems to confirm the phenomenon: Insect populations are in decline in many parts of the world.

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Weekend Reads | Seattle’s Greenhouse Gas Emissions

by Kevin Schofield


This weekend’s read is a new report from the City of Seattle’s Office of Sustainability and Environment, which provides an inventory of the city’s greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in 2020. It looks at both the magnitude of GHG emissions as well as the sources, and it gives us an interesting and insightful look at what it will take to make meaningful reduction in the city’s contribution to global warming.

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