Tag Archives: Filipino American

PHOTO ESSAY | Filipino American Activists Commemorate 50th Anniversary of Philippine Martial Law

by Ronnie Estoque


On the evening of Sept. 20, an estimated 100 Filipino American activists and community members from BAYAN USA Seattle, Malaya Movement, International Coalition of Human Rights in the Philippines Seattle, Kabataan Alliance Washington, and the International League of People’s Struggle Seattle-Tacoma gathered for the 50th anniversary of martial law being declared in the Philippines by Ferdinand Marcos.

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Cindy Domingo Reflects on Philippine Election Results

by Ronnie Estoque

The Seattle Globalist was a daily online publication that covered the connections between local and global issues in Seattle. The Emerald is keeping alive its legacy of highlighting our city’s diverse voices by regularly publishing and re-publishing stories aligned with the Globalist’s mission. 


Filipino American activist and community member Cindy Domingo was a vital leader in the 1970s movement against the Marcos dictatorship in the Philippines. She led international solidarity campaigns on the University of Washington campus and became an active organizer of the Union of Democratic Filipinos (Katipunan ng mga Demokratikong Pilipino KDP) in both Seattle and Oakland. 

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Midnight Supply Company: Making All Your Merch Dreams Come True

by Patheresa Wells


Often our dreams do not take a direct route to fruition. For instance, if we came across our younger selves, we might need to tell a story about how we got to where we are. For Christine Geronimo, owner of Midnight Supply Company, a Filipina woman-owned print shop in South Park, the road to becoming a merch maven started with music. 

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Chef Melissa Miranda of Musang Nourishes Community Stories Through Food

by Amanda Ong


When Chef Melissa Miranda was younger and working as a sous-chef at French and Italian restaurants, she never thought an upscale Filipino restaurant would be a possibility. Miranda studied sociology; attended culinary school in Florence, Italy; and worked in restaurants in New York City before coming back home to Seattle, where she had the opportunity she never imagined: She founded Musang, an upscale Filipino restaurant that began as a pop-up in 2016 before becoming a full-fledged restaurant in Beacon Hill in 2020. Today, Musang’s success has earned Miranda major notoriety: She’s a James Beard Award semifinalist for best chef, Northwest and Pacific.

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Nic Masangkay Is Redefining ‘Mothers’ in a New Age of Love

by Sarah Goh


Newly released on March 18, 2022, Nic Masangkay’s “Mothers” explores the unlearning of possessive love and how to better honor our matriarchs. The song was inspired by 2000s R&B music and was released with a new music video filmed in Washington’s Deception Pass.   

“Mothers” is the second single to Masangkay’s larger project, We Came of Age as Love Was Changing, which will be a prose poetry book, music album, and multimedia performance.

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Dr. Dorothy Cordova Celebrates 90 Years of Building Beloved Community in Seattle

by Jasmine M. Pulido


A woman in a fuzzy knee-length coat, one that sported her signature shade of bright red, made her way out of Immaculate Conception Church, Seattle’s oldest Catholic church located in the Central District, on a bright Sunday afternoon. She may be under 5 feet, but that didn’t stop her from standing tall. She was preparing herself to celebrate her 90th birthday with a cascade of family surrounding her.

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OPINION: What Alex Tizon Taught Me About Visibility

by Jasmine M. Pulido


Alex Tizon is so much like me it’s almost laughable.

He was a Filipino American journalist writing in Seattle with a specific aim to uplift the narratives of those most marginalized from society. He wrote long-format philosophical essays driven by a need to deeply understand himself, others, and the most foundational parts of our humanity. He delved into themes like invisibility, complicity, and authenticity without shying away from the most difficult emotions like shame, guilt, and pain. He had two daughters. His Lola — the subject of his award-winning piece in The Atlantic — even shares my last name, a fact that my in-laws assure me is merely a coincidence.

All like me.

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PHOTO ESSAY: Anakbayan South Seattle Celebrates Chapter Launch

by Ronnie Estoque

The Seattle Globalist was a daily online publication that covered the connections between local and global issues in Seattle. The Emerald is keeping alive its legacy of highlighting our city’s diverse voices by regularly publishing and re-publishing stories aligned with the Globalist’s mission. 


Local Filipino community members gathered at the Othello-UW Commons on Oct. 24 to celebrate the new chapter launch of Anakbayan South Seattle. Several members in leadership, including Rizelle and Linda, gave speeches during the event, which also featured cultural performances from organizations such as GABRIELA Seattle.

Established in 2002, Anakbayan Seattle was the first overseas chapter of the organization to be founded in the U.S. Anakbayan South Seattle hopes to continue engaging Filipino youth and community members in South Seattle that are looking to learn more about the history of activism and revolution in the Philippines. The chapter also seeks to spread awareness about current issues affecting Filipinos such as poverty and labor exploitation domestically and internationally.

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Filipino Community Members Make Modern History

by Jasmine M. Pulido


What does the making of modern history feel like to those of us who have been systematically erased from it?

In Washington State, it was only a little over two years ago, on May 7, 2019, when our Gov. Jay Inslee officially signed Filipino American History Month (FAHM) into law. While the Washington State Legislature has proclaimed October as Filipino American History Month since 2010, organizations like Filipino American National Historical Society (FANHS), along with other local Filipino community members and activists, have recognized it for decades and have pushed for it to be commemorated more seriously by lobbying for the signing of SB 5685.

Passing FAHM into law was a major event of modern history for Filipino and Filipino American community members. For Filipino American community members with real stakes in the larger goal of Filipino American culture and identity, having a legitimate home within our rainy city, it feels like the beginning of a deep wrong finally becoming right.

Local Filipino American community members and educators don’t take this step lightly and, in fact, have used it as a means to catapult Filipino American studies and language into Seattle’s public school curriculum within just a month’s time.

This October, multiple Filipino American organizations in Seattle have worked together to rapidly progress two City initiatives within the public school system — the development of a Filipino American curriculum and, separately but within the same month, the paving of a way for students to more feasibly receive school credit for learning or already knowing Filipino languages like Tagalog, Ilocano, and Visayan.

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Honoring the Life of Jose Daep, Community Member and Beloved Father

by Ronnie Estoque


Nate Daep remembers his father, Jose Daep, who died in September of COVID-19, as a supportive and loving family man. “My father was a man who not only expressed his love through his words but expressed it through his actions,” Nate Daep said.

Jose Daep was born in Itogon, Benguet, Philippines, on March 19, 1942. He studied mechanical engineering at the Saint Louis University in Baguio and helped out his parents with their recycling company by driving back and forth from the capital city of Manila. Like many other Filipinos that leave the Philippines to provide for their families back home as overseas Filipino workers, Jose relocated to Australia and Zambia before applying for his petition to come to the U.S. in 1970. After 17 years, his petition was eventually accepted and the Daep family was able to immigrate to the U.S. in 1987. They settled in a house Jose built in Pacific, WA.

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