Tag Archives: Filipino Community

Filipino Community Protests Philippine Presidential Election Results

by Ronnie Estoque

The Seattle Globalist was a daily online publication that covered the connections between local and global issues in Seattle. The Emerald is keeping alive its legacy of highlighting our city’s diverse voices by regularly publishing and re-publishing stories aligned with the Globalist’s mission. 


“Never again, never again, never again to martial law!” was a unifying chant that filled the streets of the Chinatown-International District (CID) on May 10, when Filipino activists held a march and rally from Dr. José Rizal Park to Hing Hay Park in protest of a Ferdinand Marcos Jr. presidency. Dr. José Rizal is a national hero of the Philippines, who aided in agitating Filipinos to lead a revolution against Spanish colonizers during the late 1800s. 

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Hillman City’s Archipelago Burglarized

by Ronnie Estoque


Archipelago, a nationally recognized Filipino restaurant located in South End’s Hillman City neighborhood, was recently broken into, possibly reflecting a disturbing trend for local businesses. 

Amber Manuguid, co-owner of Archipelago, had spent the morning of Nov. 7 playing with her son, since Sundays are her only day off, and found out about the incident about two hours after it happened.

“I grabbed my phone to play him [son] something and saw the alerts from our security system,” Manuguid said. “Our security timeline says there was a brief power outage when they entered.”

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PHOTO ESSAY: Anakbayan South Seattle Celebrates Chapter Launch

by Ronnie Estoque

The Seattle Globalist was a daily online publication that covered the connections between local and global issues in Seattle. The Emerald is keeping alive its legacy of highlighting our city’s diverse voices by regularly publishing and re-publishing stories aligned with the Globalist’s mission. 


Local Filipino community members gathered at the Othello-UW Commons on Oct. 24 to celebrate the new chapter launch of Anakbayan South Seattle. Several members in leadership, including Rizelle and Linda, gave speeches during the event, which also featured cultural performances from organizations such as GABRIELA Seattle.

Established in 2002, Anakbayan Seattle was the first overseas chapter of the organization to be founded in the U.S. Anakbayan South Seattle hopes to continue engaging Filipino youth and community members in South Seattle that are looking to learn more about the history of activism and revolution in the Philippines. The chapter also seeks to spread awareness about current issues affecting Filipinos such as poverty and labor exploitation domestically and internationally.

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Filipino Community Members Make Modern History

by Jasmine M. Pulido


What does the making of modern history feel like to those of us who have been systematically erased from it?

In Washington State, it was only a little over two years ago, on May 7, 2019, when our Gov. Jay Inslee officially signed Filipino American History Month (FAHM) into law. While the Washington State Legislature has proclaimed October as Filipino American History Month since 2010, organizations like Filipino American National Historical Society (FANHS), along with other local Filipino community members and activists, have recognized it for decades and have pushed for it to be commemorated more seriously by lobbying for the signing of SB 5685.

Passing FAHM into law was a major event of modern history for Filipino and Filipino American community members. For Filipino American community members with real stakes in the larger goal of Filipino American culture and identity, having a legitimate home within our rainy city, it feels like the beginning of a deep wrong finally becoming right.

Local Filipino American community members and educators don’t take this step lightly and, in fact, have used it as a means to catapult Filipino American studies and language into Seattle’s public school curriculum within just a month’s time.

This October, multiple Filipino American organizations in Seattle have worked together to rapidly progress two City initiatives within the public school system — the development of a Filipino American curriculum and, separately but within the same month, the paving of a way for students to more feasibly receive school credit for learning or already knowing Filipino languages like Tagalog, Ilocano, and Visayan.

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Honoring the Life of Jose Daep, Community Member and Beloved Father

by Ronnie Estoque


Nate Daep remembers his father, Jose Daep, who died in September of COVID-19, as a supportive and loving family man. “My father was a man who not only expressed his love through his words but expressed it through his actions,” Nate Daep said.

Jose Daep was born in Itogon, Benguet, Philippines, on March 19, 1942. He studied mechanical engineering at the Saint Louis University in Baguio and helped out his parents with their recycling company by driving back and forth from the capital city of Manila. Like many other Filipinos that leave the Philippines to provide for their families back home as overseas Filipino workers, Jose relocated to Australia and Zambia before applying for his petition to come to the U.S. in 1970. After 17 years, his petition was eventually accepted and the Daep family was able to immigrate to the U.S. in 1987. They settled in a house Jose built in Pacific, WA.

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Grab a ‘Bite of Pinoy’ — Filipino Food and Culture in the South End This Saturday

by Ronnie Estoque


On Saturday, Aug. 21, “Bite of Pinoy” (BoP) will be occurring at Rainier Playfield (3700 South Alaska Street) from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. The event will feature food vendors such as Filipino Styled Peanuts, Mekenie Pampangga’s Special, and Hungry for Grace. 

The main organizers behind BoP include Tootsie Borromeo and Jon Madamba both of Jack N Poy Productions and VXVIII Events. Other organizers who have helped this event become a reality for the community include Bel Borromeo, Rein Angeles, Aileen Angeles, Francis Halili, and Rowena Halili.

Tootsie and Madamba had sought an opportunity to bring the Filipino community together due to the annual Pista sa Nayon festival being hosted on a virtual platform this year. They initially struggled to find a venue for the event, but when the City of Seattle reached out to find food vendors for their annual Big Day of Play event, the “Bite of Pinoy” was born as a collaborative effort.

“It is so important to have events such as this not only to expose and exchange cultural ideas among different cultures but also to bridge the gap between generations amongst the Filipino community,” Tootsie said.

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After 10 Years, Jill Mangaliman’s Departure From Got Green Leaves a Lasting Legacy

by Ronnie Estoque


Last month, Got Green, a South Seattle-based grassroots organization that works towards environmental, racial, and economic justice made a big announcement. The organization’s executive director, Jill Mangaliman, transitioned out of their position after a decade. Mangaliman joined Got Green as a volunteer in 2009 and has left a lasting impact on the organization through their leadership on various campaigns and programs over the years.

“I definitely consider myself like, you know, I call it a late bloomer,” Mangaliman said regarding their long-time community organizing work. They had grown up in a Filipino household where the discussion of politics rarely occurred, so they consider their road to activism to have begun much later in their life.

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PHOTO ESSAY: Filipino Community Mobilizes Against Philippine President at Othello Park

by Ronnie Estoque

The Seattle Globalist was a daily online publication that covered the connections between local and global issues in Seattle. The Emerald is keeping alive its legacy of highlighting our city’s diverse voices by regularly publishing and re-publishing stories aligned with the Globalist’s mission. 


On Saturday, July 31, BAYAN Seattle and Malaya Movement coordinated a rally and carnival to launch the Duterte Wakasan Na Movement, which seeks the resignation of Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte for human rights violations in the country. Human Rights Watch reports that extrajudicial killings in the country — often committed under the guise of a “war on drugs” — have increased dramatically during the pandemic. 

The weekend event also included several bouncy houses for kids, food and games, and local performances from artists as well as group dancing. Several notable speakers in attendance included Miss Washington Maricres Castro and Washington State Sen. Rebecca Saldaña. Both expressed support for local community organizers.

“Under current President Duterte, the unjust system in the Philippines participates in suppressing dissent both by weaponizing the law to facilitate human rights abuses and by failing to enforce legal protections,” said Saldaña, who has served as a sub commissioner on Investigate PH — an organization currently conducting independent investigations of human rights violation in the country.

Last April, the Emerald published a photo essay that documented protests at Seafood City in Tukwila from the same organizations that led Saturday’s event at Othello Park. 

The Pacific Northwest is home to one of the largest Filipino populations in the country.

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Filipino Youth Grief Support Gatherings Organized to Support Local Community

by Ronnie Estoque


Within the Filipino community, mental health is a topic that is often not discussed in families and other social spheres. API Chaya’s FYRE (Filipino Youth Reunite to Elevate) program plans to continue to work on destigmatizing mental health in the local community by offering “Grief Support Gatherings” for King County Filipino youth (ages 12–24) via Zoom on July 13, July 27, Aug. 10, and Aug. 24 from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.

“We’re really wanting to make space for intergenerational healing, intergenerational community organizing, and what we’ve learned is that youth can be, you know, an important bridge across generations,” Nikki Caintic of API Chaya said.

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Filipino Community Village Set to Open this Summer

by Ronnie Estoque


The Filipino Community of Seattle (FCS) have had a vision for the Filipino Community Village (FCV) for over 10 years and have been the drivers steering the development to final fruition this summer. Four years ago, a partnership between Beacon Development Group and the FCS helped speed up the dream of providing 95 affordable apartment homes for low-income seniors in the local South Seattle area. Beacon Development Group is an affordable housing consulting firm that works with nonprofits and housing authorities and is a subsidiary of HumanGood.

“The members of the Filipino Community of Seattle have worked tirelessly to advocate for this project with elected officials at the state and local levels to stress the importance of this project and its impact not only for the Filipino community but South Seattle/Rainier Valley as a whole,” FCS Executive Director Agnes Navarro said.

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