Tag Archives: Filipino Community

Musang’s New Filipino Restaurant Kilig Is Coming to the CID

by Ronnie Estoque


Melissa Miranda, owner and chef at Filipino restaurant Musang, is embarking on another journey in 2023: the opening of Kilig in the Chinatown-International District (CID), a Filipino restaurant inspired to serve tasty dishes, such as pancit and bulalo, in a casual yet homey space. The idea came to Miranda over a year ago after engaging with community members about their experiences with different types of Filipino restaurants, places, and cuisine in the Philippines and elsewhere. 

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Holidays Around the South End – 2022

by Susan Fried


Despite a brief interlude of freezing rain and icy roads that made it difficult to travel around Seattle, people made it out to a variety of holiday events that took place around the South End. There were Christmas events, Hanukkah concerts, holiday markets, and Kwanzaa celebrations throughout the month of December. Children visited Santa, parents shopped for presents from local artisans and makers, and people of all ages enjoyed live music and dance performances.

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PHOTO ESSAY | Local Filipino Community Celebrates at The Palengke

by Ronnie Estoque


On Friday, Sept. 30, the reception hall of the Filipino Community of Seattle (FCS) filled up quickly with local community members eager to celebrate at “The Palengke,” which translates to “marketplace.” The event featured various performances, including dance from the FCS Kalahi Dance Company, drag by Atasha Manila, a karaoke contest, and line dancing to cap off the joyous occasion. Food and drinks were provided by FCS Specialty Cocktails, and food by Francis Franco, Grayseas Pies, and Beats & Eats. Retail vendors also sold their products during the event, which was filled with laughter, music, and plenty of smiles. 

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PHOTO ESSAY | Filipino American Activists Commemorate 50th Anniversary of Philippine Martial Law

by Ronnie Estoque


On the evening of Sept. 20, an estimated 100 Filipino American activists and community members from BAYAN USA Seattle, Malaya Movement, International Coalition of Human Rights in the Philippines Seattle, Kabataan Alliance Washington, and the International League of People’s Struggle Seattle-Tacoma gathered for the 50th anniversary of martial law being declared in the Philippines by Ferdinand Marcos.

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Midnight Supply Company: Making All Your Merch Dreams Come True

by Patheresa Wells


Often our dreams do not take a direct route to fruition. For instance, if we came across our younger selves, we might need to tell a story about how we got to where we are. For Christine Geronimo, owner of Midnight Supply Company, a Filipina woman-owned print shop in South Park, the road to becoming a merch maven started with music. 

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Filipino Community Protests Philippine Presidential Election Results

by Ronnie Estoque

The Seattle Globalist was a daily online publication that covered the connections between local and global issues in Seattle. The Emerald is keeping alive its legacy of highlighting our city’s diverse voices by regularly publishing and re-publishing stories aligned with the Globalist’s mission. 


“Never again, never again, never again to martial law!” was a unifying chant that filled the streets of the Chinatown-International District (CID) on May 10, when Filipino activists held a march and rally from Dr. José Rizal Park to Hing Hay Park in protest of a Ferdinand Marcos Jr. presidency. Dr. José Rizal is a national hero of the Philippines, who aided in agitating Filipinos to lead a revolution against Spanish colonizers during the late 1800s. 

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Hillman City’s Archipelago Burglarized

by Ronnie Estoque


Archipelago, a nationally recognized Filipino restaurant located in South End’s Hillman City neighborhood, was recently broken into, possibly reflecting a disturbing trend for local businesses. 

Amber Manuguid, co-owner of Archipelago, had spent the morning of Nov. 7 playing with her son, since Sundays are her only day off, and found out about the incident about two hours after it happened.

“I grabbed my phone to play him [son] something and saw the alerts from our security system,” Manuguid said. “Our security timeline says there was a brief power outage when they entered.”

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PHOTO ESSAY: Anakbayan South Seattle Celebrates Chapter Launch

by Ronnie Estoque

The Seattle Globalist was a daily online publication that covered the connections between local and global issues in Seattle. The Emerald is keeping alive its legacy of highlighting our city’s diverse voices by regularly publishing and re-publishing stories aligned with the Globalist’s mission. 


Local Filipino community members gathered at the Othello-UW Commons on Oct. 24 to celebrate the new chapter launch of Anakbayan South Seattle. Several members in leadership, including Rizelle and Linda, gave speeches during the event, which also featured cultural performances from organizations such as GABRIELA Seattle.

Established in 2002, Anakbayan Seattle was the first overseas chapter of the organization to be founded in the U.S. Anakbayan South Seattle hopes to continue engaging Filipino youth and community members in South Seattle that are looking to learn more about the history of activism and revolution in the Philippines. The chapter also seeks to spread awareness about current issues affecting Filipinos such as poverty and labor exploitation domestically and internationally.

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Filipino Community Members Make Modern History

by Jasmine M. Pulido


What does the making of modern history feel like to those of us who have been systematically erased from it?

In Washington State, it was only a little over two years ago, on May 7, 2019, when our Gov. Jay Inslee officially signed Filipino American History Month (FAHM) into law. While the Washington State Legislature has proclaimed October as Filipino American History Month since 2010, organizations like Filipino American National Historical Society (FANHS), along with other local Filipino community members and activists, have recognized it for decades and have pushed for it to be commemorated more seriously by lobbying for the signing of SB 5685.

Passing FAHM into law was a major event of modern history for Filipino and Filipino American community members. For Filipino American community members with real stakes in the larger goal of Filipino American culture and identity, having a legitimate home within our rainy city, it feels like the beginning of a deep wrong finally becoming right.

Local Filipino American community members and educators don’t take this step lightly and, in fact, have used it as a means to catapult Filipino American studies and language into Seattle’s public school curriculum within just a month’s time.

This October, multiple Filipino American organizations in Seattle have worked together to rapidly progress two City initiatives within the public school system — the development of a Filipino American curriculum and, separately but within the same month, the paving of a way for students to more feasibly receive school credit for learning or already knowing Filipino languages like Tagalog, Ilocano, and Visayan.

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Honoring the Life of Jose Daep, Community Member and Beloved Father

by Ronnie Estoque


Nate Daep remembers his father, Jose Daep, who died in September of COVID-19, as a supportive and loving family man. “My father was a man who not only expressed his love through his words but expressed it through his actions,” Nate Daep said.

Jose Daep was born in Itogon, Benguet, Philippines, on March 19, 1942. He studied mechanical engineering at the Saint Louis University in Baguio and helped out his parents with their recycling company by driving back and forth from the capital city of Manila. Like many other Filipinos that leave the Philippines to provide for their families back home as overseas Filipino workers, Jose relocated to Australia and Zambia before applying for his petition to come to the U.S. in 1970. After 17 years, his petition was eventually accepted and the Daep family was able to immigrate to the U.S. in 1987. They settled in a house Jose built in Pacific, WA.

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