Tag Archives: Health Care

Ann Okwuwolu’s Fifth Annual Juneteenth Event Offers History, Resources, More in Othello Park

by Chamidae Ford


It Takes A Village — AMSA Edition, a local nonprofit, will host its fifth annual in-person Juneteenth Celebration on Saturday, June 19, at Othello Park from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Ann Okwuwolu, the creator of the festival, is a former medical technician who was inspired to start the celebration in 2016 when she recognized the lack of Black representation in New Holly Community events. 

“Everything was geared towards other people. And so we didn’t have any visibility,” Okwuwolu said. 

Continue reading Ann Okwuwolu’s Fifth Annual Juneteenth Event Offers History, Resources, More in Othello Park

Black Nurses Matter March Highlights Need to Address Medical Racism

by Ashley Archibald


If you ask her family, Kaloni Bolton, 12, was a bubbly, peaceful person who kept everybody upbeat and uplifted. She was tough, always had an opinion and a personality that balanced the family out.

Bolton died on Jan. 1 after suffering an asthma attack on Dec. 29. Her family alleges that Bolton received substandard care from Valley Medical Center (VMC), a nonprofit health care provider that oversees two urgent care facilities in Renton that Bolton and her sister visited before Bolton was transferred to Seattle Children’s Hospital.

“The entire system failed her, failed her family,” Lylia Nichols told a crowd of protesters on Saturday, May 8, outside of the first urgent care facility that Bolton accessed. “We hold Kaloni up because the system failed our whole community.”

Continue reading Black Nurses Matter March Highlights Need to Address Medical Racism

Q&A: Nikkita Oliver Focuses on Mutual Aid, Community in Campaign for City Council

by Chamidae Ford


Nikkita Oliver has made a name for themselves in Seattle and beyond. The lawyer, artist, professor, and abolitionist is bringing their many skills to the race for Position 9, one of two at-large seats on the Seattle City Council.

On Mar. 10, Oliver announced their candidacy, a grassroots campaign centered around mutual aid that prioritizes providing community members with basic needs. This is not Oliver’s first attempt at a bid for public office — in 2017 they began their political career with a run for mayor, narrowly missing out on the general election.

Oliver is currently the executive director of Creative Justice, an organization that focuses on providing art therapy as an alternative to incarceration. They are also deeply involved in Seattle’s Black Lives Matter movement and have worked closely with organizations to serve marginalized communities.

Continue reading Q&A: Nikkita Oliver Focuses on Mutual Aid, Community in Campaign for City Council

OPINION: More Will Die From Covid Without Meaningful Change to Health Care

by Asqual Getaneh, MD


In February 2020, International Community Health Services (ICHS) was the first of the nation’s nearly 1,400 federally qualified health centers — serving 30 million people, most of them low-income immigrants and refugees — with a positive COVID-19 diagnosis.

Our staff have seen the tragic costs of a pandemic that has infected more than 100 million people worldwide and claimed more than 2 million deaths. So, when the first doses of the Moderna vaccine rolled through our doors on Dec. 23, we felt ready.

Continue reading OPINION: More Will Die From Covid Without Meaningful Change to Health Care

OPINION: Washington’s Children Shouldn’t Have to Relive Our Past Mistakes

by Dr. Stephan Blanford and Misha Werschkul


Since the pandemic’s onset, Washington families have experienced a rolling crisis in jobs, hunger, health, and education. The prospect of eviction hangs over far too many. Food insecurity has skyrocketed. Child care facilities have closed, many of them permanently. And a rocky transition to remote learning is now impeding students’ educational progress. The acute stress on children and families may harm kids’ health, their education, and their ability to earn a living.

Continue reading OPINION: Washington’s Children Shouldn’t Have to Relive Our Past Mistakes

Healthcare Workers at Carolyn Downs Protest Executive Director Reinstatement Despite Allegations of Racism

by Jasmine M. Pulido


On the afternoon of Thursday, January 28, two dozen doctors, nurses, and support staff walked out of Carolyn Downs Family Medical Center in protest of the announcement that the clinic’s white male executive director, Raleigh Watts, would be reinstated on February 1 after being on paid administrative leave since October 2020. Dating back to October 2020, Watts was under an ongoing internal investigation into allegations of microaggressions, workplace abuse, and preferential treatment based on race. 

Continue reading Healthcare Workers at Carolyn Downs Protest Executive Director Reinstatement Despite Allegations of Racism

Filipino Health Care Workers and Their Battle Against COVID-19

by Ronnie Estoque


Clea Patriarca Alverio-Hume, 57, served as the medical records director at Queen Anne Healthcare, a skilled nursing facility, and she also worked for Swedish Medical Center where she was the lead admission coordinating assistant at the Transfer and Operations Center.

On May 21, 2020, Alverio-Hume developed a harsh cough. Initially, it was attributed to her allergies due to the cottonwood trees that were shedding at the time. Her allergy medicines and inhalers were filled, but they didn’t seem to help much according to her husband, David Hume. Four days later, Alverio-Hume went to a clinic to get tested as she had a minor fever and was vomiting. Her cough had gotten severely worse.

“I ended up calling the paramedics that Tuesday evening because she was having difficulty breathing,” her husband said. 

Continue reading Filipino Health Care Workers and Their Battle Against COVID-19

Y-WE Hosts Virtual Health Care Injustice Panel

by Thea White


“Young Women Empowered seeks to amplify young women’s leadership and role as courageous change makers. We believe in a world where justice is for all and we strive to make that a reality.” 

—Victoria Santos


Last Saturday, May 23, Young Women Empowered (Y-WE) hosted a virtual panel titled Y-WE Care: Exploring Health Care Injustice, to speak on the injustices this global pandemic highlights in the U.S. health care system. The panel was moderated by Y-WE’s Co-Executive Director, Victoria Santos. Santos, who battled COVID-19 in March, took some time to speak on the impact this pandemic has had among BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, People of Color) communities.

Continue reading Y-WE Hosts Virtual Health Care Injustice Panel

Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic to Open Second Location

By Carolyn Bick

When Marva Harris first adopted grandson Jeremiah in 2013, the then-infant’s tiny body was covered in eczema from head to toe. While a United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that it’s increasingly more common for Black children to suffer from the skin disease, Jeremiah was “in pretty bad shape.” Continue reading Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic to Open Second Location

OPINION: Neighborcare Union an Inspiring, Positive Change

by Valentina Warner, MD

For the past 20 years, I have worked as a physician at Neighborcare’s Rainier Beach clinic. I went into community health because I wanted to use my education to provide high quality medical care to those in my community, particularly those who are often treated as second class citizens. I wanted to find a place where, when people are facing hard times and medical problems come up, there is an open door for them, regardless of their insurance, immigration status, or financial situation. I came to Neighborcare because it was committed to the same values.

Continue reading OPINION: Neighborcare Union an Inspiring, Positive Change