Tag Archives: Health

Patients Are Traveling From Texas for Abortion Care. This May Be the New Normal.

by Megan Burbank


At midnight on the first day of September, after the Supreme Court failed to respond to an appeal from abortion providers, a law banning abortions after six weeks of pregnancy went into effect in Texas. SB 8 has ended access to an estimated 85% of procedures, empowered ordinary people to sue fellow citizens for seeking out or facilitating abortion care, and pushed patients to seek care across state lines, some as far as the Pacific Northwest. Less than a month after SB 8’s implementation, Planned Parenthood disclosed to the Emerald that its Central District Health Center had seen its first patient from Texas.

This disruption in care, and rise in anti-abortion vigilanteism, has already been challenged by the Justice Department and drawn widespread criticism. Reproductive health care providers question its use of the term “fetal heartbeat,” a descriptor that’s more emotional than clinical (the sound heard on ultrasounds is caused by electrical activity; heart valves aren’t actually present). Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor offered a blistering, Ruth Bader Ginsburg-esque dissent calling the law “clearly unconstitutional.” The law has even been condemned by private companies like Lyft, which established a defense fund to cover legal fees for drivers sued under the law. In the words of one Slate headline: “The Supreme Court Overturned Roe v. Wade in the Most Cowardly Manner Imaginable.”

But none of these objections lessen the impact the law has already had. SB 8 has had “a chilling effect” on abortion providers in Texas, said Lisa Humes-Schulz, vice president of policy and regulatory affairs at Planned Parenthood Alliance Advocates. “No one wants to get sued,” she added, and the fallout has been swift.

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Weekend Long Reads: The Kids Are Eating a Lot More Pizza

by Kevin Schofield


This weekend’s “long read” is a report from a 20-year study on the food consumption habits of American youth. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NAHANES) has been collecting data since 1999, in two-year intervals, on what foods kids are eating, broken out across four categories: unprocessed and minimally processed; processed culinary ingredients such as oils; processed foods like cheeses; and “ultraprocessed” foods such as fast food, sweetened beverages, and store-bought ready-to-heat dishes.

In their most recent cohort, 2017–2018, they found that over two-thirds of the calories consumed by youth are from ultraprocessed food, up from 61.4% in 1999. The ready-to-heat/eat category jumped from 2.2% all the way up to 11.1%; that includes store-bought pizza, hamburgers, and sandwiches, and pizza alone is now over 5% of kids’ total calorie consumption.

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PHOTO ESSAY: Fathers and Sons Together Barbershop Event Encourages Hope

by Susan Fried


About a half dozen barbers volunteered their services last weekend so people could get free haircuts at Rainier Beach Community Center plaza. In addition to the cuts, there was food, entertainment, and free COVID-19 vaccines. The event was held in partnership with the Department of Neighborhoods and hosted by Fathers and Sons Together (FAST) — a youth development organization that aims to nurture the relationships between fathers and sons. It also featured three panel discussions around significant issues affecting the community, including one on health and wellness — in particular how they relate to COVID-19 — one on the recent surge in gun violence, and a third to discuss ways to help youth and create positive change in the community.

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The 27th Year of Beatwalk Brings Free Live Music Back to Columbia City

by Mark Van Streefkerk


After over a year of empty stages, live music has officially returned, and Columbia City Beatwalk is one grassroots organizing team that’s making it happen. Now in it’s 27th year, Beatwalk is bringing folks together from all walks of life for free outdoor music and entertainment right in the heart of Columbia City. 

Their next Block Party event on Saturday, July 31, is something you don’t want to miss. Partnering for the first time with B.U.I.L.D. 206 — an organization with the vision that Black men are empowered leaders and mentors making positive changes in the lives of Black men and youth — the Block Party will feature games, contests, prizes, and a star-studded lineup of DJs, ending with neo soul and hip hop conscious group Black Stax. The family-friendly event will also include mostly Black and POC vendors with a focus on locally-made wares like oils, jewelry, candles, clothing, and more. The party takes place at “The Patio” on Rainier Avenue South and South Ferdinand Street between Geraldine’s Counter and Lottie’s Lounge. 

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OPINION: More Will Die From Covid Without Meaningful Change to Health Care

by Asqual Getaneh, MD


In February 2020, International Community Health Services (ICHS) was the first of the nation’s nearly 1,400 federally qualified health centers — serving 30 million people, most of them low-income immigrants and refugees — with a positive COVID-19 diagnosis.

Our staff have seen the tragic costs of a pandemic that has infected more than 100 million people worldwide and claimed more than 2 million deaths. So, when the first doses of the Moderna vaccine rolled through our doors on Dec. 23, we felt ready.

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#StaySafeSouthEnd: This Is How We Do It

The Emerald wants to know how you’re keeping yourselves — and each other — safe these days. We hope you’ll share your stories with us! #StaySafeSouthEnd

by Emerald Staff


For some time, we at the Emerald have been discussing what staying safe during this viral pandemic looks like as we serve our community. Naturally, it looks like following the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines for health and safety as well as directives from Public Health — Seattle-King County. But guidelines are just that, leaving plenty of room for interpretation.

Furthermore, since the outbreak hit the Seattle area, there’s been a lot of misinformation and bad advice circulating. It’s hard to keep up, and bottom line — there’s no silver bullet. It’s a daily struggle to effectively prevent the spread of invisible germs and manage ongoing shut downs and life in quarantine.

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Misdiagnosis, Missed Opportunities, and Mistrust: How Race Influences Cancer Treatment in Black Women

by Carolyn Bick

Linda Koerber isn’t tall. Sitting at the table in the back room of the Cynthia Green Family Center in South Seattle, Koerber can just barely comfortably rest her arms on the table, as she calmly describes her ongoing fight against cancer as a Black woman. She wears red lipstick, because “I’m not dying today. So, that’s why I wear red lipstick every day.”

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Weekly Rainier Beach Walking Group Blends Health, Safety, and Community

by Aaron Burkhalter

Ready with their walking shoes, they gathered in a small meeting room at the Rainier Beach Community Center to start. After a brief chat, they were ready to enjoy a stroll in the sun.

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OPINION: Neighborcare Union an Inspiring, Positive Change

by Valentina Warner, MD

For the past 20 years, I have worked as a physician at Neighborcare’s Rainier Beach clinic. I went into community health because I wanted to use my education to provide high quality medical care to those in my community, particularly those who are often treated as second class citizens. I wanted to find a place where, when people are facing hard times and medical problems come up, there is an open door for them, regardless of their insurance, immigration status, or financial situation. I came to Neighborcare because it was committed to the same values.

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Clean Greens Brings Sustainable Food Economy to Seattle

by Nicole Pasia

Rev. Dr. Robert Jeffery, Sr. always enjoyed his meals, but never thought much about what he was eating. That changed in the early 2000s, when he was diagnosed with diverticulitis, an intestinal disease that affects food digestion.

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