Tag Archives: indigenous peoples

Local Indigenous Food Sovereignty Efforts Uplift the Importance of Traditional Foods

by Vee Hua 華婷婷


Home to individuals from a number of tribal nations, the Puget Sound region serves as fertile ground for conversations and movements towards Indigenous food sovereignty. While many definitions of food sovereignty exist, the Indian Education Division at the Montana Office of Public Instruction defines it as “the ability of an Indigenous nation or community to control its own food system and food-producing resources free of control or limitations put on it by an outside power (such as a settler/colonizer government).”

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Indigenize Productions Brings Healing, Dance, and Joy to Native and BIPOC Communities

by Amanda Ong


Since 2017, Indigenize Productions has been showcasing queer and trans Indigenous joy in different ways, from hosting variety shows to dance parties. Indigenize was founded after a group of Indigenous talents met through a burlesque and variety show called “Dear White People” with an all-BIPOC cast at the University of Washington Ethnic Cultural Theatre. 

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Indigenous Press YOLTEOTL Opens in September

by Patheresa Wells


YOLTEOTL Press, an Indigenous printmaking and traditional arts studio, will open in Ballard in early September. The press is the brainchild of Ixtlixochitl Salinas-White Hawk, an Indigenous artist, community advocate, and matriarch. Located in BallardWorks at 2856 NW Market Street, the press will be a space not only to showcase and create Indigenous art, but also a place to share culture across generations. 

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Seafair Indian Days Powwow Returns In-Person to ‘Remember, Reconnect, Revive’

by Vee Hua 華婷婷


The annual Seafair Indian Days Powwow returns July 15 to 17, celebrating its 33rd year at Daybreak Star Indian Cultural Center’s Powwow Grounds in Discovery Park. This year’s powwow emerges from pandemic closures with the powerful theme of “Remember, Reconnect, Revive,” and is hosted by United Indians of All Tribes Foundation (UIATF). Open to Native and non-Native attendees, the Seafair Indian Days Powwow can draw about 12,000 visitors over the course of a weekend, and features a variety of competitive dance performances, food vendors, arts and crafts vendors, and networking opportunities.

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Changes Needed to Improve Police Response to Missing Indigenous Persons Cases

by Elizabeth Turnbull


On Thursday, May 19, Seattle City Councilmembers and organizers with the Seattle Indian Health Board urged the Seattle Police Department (SPD) to change its racial identification protocol and to collaborate with local tribal law enforcement in order to better respond to missing and murdered Indigenous person cases. 

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Beacon Arts’ May Street Fair Will Feature an Indigenous Peoples Market

by Patheresa Wells


Beacon Arts is a volunteer-run neighborhood arts council that works to build community in Beacon Hill through programs, arts opportunities, and events, as well as a monthly street fair. Every second Saturday from April through September, the fair provides an outdoor safe space for neighbors to reunite and connect after sheltering in place for so long. Each monthly event has a theme and includes art and food vendors, live music, entertainment, community information, and a garden share!

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Seedcast: Art, Revolution, and Native Futurity

by Eileen Jimenez

Help the Emerald create more “ripples and sparks” throughout the community! I’m the publisher’s mother and an Emerald founding board member. I’ve lived in Seattle all my life. Over most of those 77 years, the brilliance, diversity, and beauty of our community lacked a constant spotlight — that was until the Emerald came along. I’ve seen my son and the Emerald team sacrifice sleep, health care, self-care, and better salaries elsewhere to keep the Emerald shining a light on our community. I’d never ask anyone to make that kind of sacrifice, but I do ask to do what you can today to support the Emerald as a Rainmaker, or sustaining donor, during their 8th anniversary campaign, Ripples & Sparks at Home, April 20–28. Become a Rainmaker today by choosing the “recurring donor” option on the donation page!

—Cynthia “Mama” Green, The Publisher’s Mama & Rainmaker 

Since time immemorial, Indigenous people have celebrated storytelling as a way to connect the present to past lessons and future dreaming. Narrative sovereignty is a form of land guardianship, and Nia Tero supports this work through its storytelling initiatives, including the Seedcast podcast, as well as in this monthly column for media partner the South Seattle Emerald.


My mother is Maria Cruz, my grandmother is Eloisa Saavedra, and my great-grandmother is Isidora Saavedra. They are matriarchs of the Otomi people, an Indigenous group in Michoacán/Guanajuato, Mexico. I was the first member of my family to be born in the U.S., and I was raised in Anaheim, California. I currently live ​on occupied Duwamish Territory (Seattle, Washington). I am a queer Indigneous printmaker, a doctoral student, and the dean for Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences at South Seattle College. I am also currently a Nia Tero Pacific Northwest Art Fellow. 

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New Intertribal Parenting Group Offers Indigenous Families a Way to Reconnect With Tradition

by Alexa Peters


When Kendra Aguilar was a child, her grandfather gifted her a Chia Pet. But rather than plant the chia seeds as the instructions described, she ate them.

Aguilar, a descendant of the Soboba Band of Luiseño Indians, long told the story as an example of the funny, impulsive things kids do. Then, years later, she shared the memory with a Chumash friend and realized something deeper might be at work.

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OPINION: We Must Free Leonard Peltier

by Eric B. Alipio (Diné/Filipino; he/him/his)


From before I can remember to the age of 17, I spent many weekends hanging out, cleaning dishes, and flipping frybread at Intertribal Friendship House in Oakland, California. My mom grew up at this Native American community center, which meant my sister and I would too. 

When I entered the hall one day as a preteen, banners and a solemn mood hung over everyone’s head. Breaking the communal silence, a Diné elder shared a prayer in our language, and then in English. The prayer went to all of us, then extended far past Oakland, and into a secluded cell where the Elder hoped it landed with Leonard Peltier. This wasn’t our usual community dinner and celebration, but a rally for Peltier — a wrongfully imprisoned spirit-warrior. 

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Seedcast: You Don’t Leave Anything Behind

by Michael Painter

Since time immemorial, Indigenous people have celebrated storytelling as a way to connect the present to past lessons and future dreaming. Narrative sovereignty is a form of land guardianship, and Nia Tero supports this work through its storytelling initiatives, including the Seedcast podcast, as well as in this monthly column for media partner the South Seattle Emerald.

Content Warning: This piece includes references to the experience of attending Indigenous boarding schools in the United States and the aftermath of catastrophic weather events.


When I introduce myself, I start with the most important: I’m a citizen of the Cherokee Nation. I grew up in Indian Territory, often referred to as Oklahoma. I currently live on the traditional homelands of the Duwamish peoples, now known as West Seattle. Then, if there’s time, I share a little about my job and life experience. I’m a lawyer, a family physician, a father and grandfather, and I’m managing director, Programs at Nia Tero based in Coast Salish Territory.

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