Tag Archives: Kevin Schofield

Weekend Reads | Seattle’s Greenhouse Gas Emissions

by Kevin Schofield


This weekend’s read is a new report from the City of Seattle’s Office of Sustainability and Environment, which provides an inventory of the city’s greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in 2020. It looks at both the magnitude of GHG emissions as well as the sources, and it gives us an interesting and insightful look at what it will take to make meaningful reduction in the city’s contribution to global warming.

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Weekend Reads | Trying to Understand Long COVID

by Kevin Schofield


For many people, contracting COVID-19 is the gift that keeps on giving, with symptoms persisting potentially for months after the initial illness. People with “long COVID” complain about some combination of fatigue, body pain, and ongoing respiratory and cognitive problems. However, the exact symptoms vary from person to person, as does the length of time they persist. That’s made long COVID a huge challenge for the medical community to understand, diagnose, and treat. But as time has passed, more long COVID cases have been documented, and more studies have been completed, we’re starting to get a better understanding of its parameters.

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Weekend Reads | Is It Getting Harder or Easier to Vote?

by Kevin Schofield


This weekend’s read is a research paper by a trio of researchers looking at the relative “cost of voting” in each of the 50 United States. By “cost of voting,” they mean how much effort it takes to register to vote and ultimately cast one’s vote.

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Weekend Reads | Coyotes and Gray Wolves and Dogs, Oh My!

by Kevin Schofield


Do you remember the “tree of life” that we all studied in high school biology classes, the one that documented how the species on Earth today descended from common ancestors? For hundreds of years, species ancestry was pieced together the hard way: by comparing the phenotypes of organisms. A phenotype is the set of observable characteristics of a species, everything from basic size, shape, and color to specific body parts, such as fingers, toes, wings, and eyes. Understanding that evolution is a long series of small adjustments, rather than large leaps, biologists looked for physical resemblances to make judgments about how closely related two species are.

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Weekend Reads | The Midlife Crisis and White Supremacist ‘Gangs’

by Kevin Schofield


Elliott Jaques, a 20th century psychoanalyst, is credited with coining the term “mid-life crisis” in an article he wrote in 1965, though he in turn credits author and artist Richard Church for defining it in his autobiography:

There seems to be a biological reason for men and women, when they reach the middle thirties, finding themselves beset with misgivings, agonizing inquiries, and a loss of zest.

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Weekend Reads | We Need to Talk About Fascism

by Kevin Schofield


Unless you’ve been hiding in a cave, you’re well aware that there has been a tremendous amount of political pearl-clutching since President Biden recently called MAGA Republicans “semi-fascists.” Of course, Biden was hardly the first to use the seven-letter F-word; former President Trump repeatedly used it to describe Democrats, and members of both political parties have trotted it out over the years when it served their purposes. But what does it mean to call someone a fascist?

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Weekend Reads | ‘Pay Penalty’ for Teachers Is Higher Than Ever

by Kevin Schofield


This weekend’s read is a report from the Washington, D.C.-based Economic Policy Institute (EPI), which describes itself as “a nonprofit, nonpartisan think tank created in 1986 to include the needs of low- and middle-income workers in economic policy discussions.” The report analyzes trends in teacher pay in the United States since 1979 — and the news is not good.

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