Tag Archives: Music

OPINION: We Must Continue Lifting the Voice of Every Womxn

by Shasti Conrad


In 2020, we saw people across the country make their voices heard with an urgency America hasn’t witnessed in decades. We marched in cities from coast to coast to express the need for social justice in our country. We advocated for change, pushing for more equity and inclusion.

The core of our chorus in protest after protest, “Black Lives Matter,” is a demand for action — an insistent call to finally tend to the overdue work of elevating Black voices and centering Black experiences. 

That call was heeded at the ballot box here in Washington State, with more Black candidates elected than ever before.

Now that we have transitioned into 2021, it is more important than ever to keep building that momentum beyond electoral politics. We must continue to lift our voices and advocate for change throughout our society. 

Continue reading OPINION: We Must Continue Lifting the Voice of Every Womxn

NEWS GLEAMS: ‘Sharks at the Beach,’ Philanthropy Northwest Hiring, Plus a Grant & a Scholarship

curated by Emerald Staff

A round-up of news and announcements we don’t want to get lost in the fast-churning news cycle! 


2021 “Sharks at the Beach”

Urban Impact wants to know: Do you, or do you know someone who needs help launching their business idea or growing their “side hustle?”

Why yes, myself and/or someone I know does need help with that, you say. Well then, check out Urban Impact’s Sharks at the Beach entrepreneurship program. Note: There was an info session on the 20th — don’t worry, there’s still time to get in on this! The deadline to apply is Friday, Jan. 29 at 11 p.m. Use this web form to apply or you can email the administrator, Keristian Farra, from there if you have any questions.

Continue reading NEWS GLEAMS: ‘Sharks at the Beach,’ Philanthropy Northwest Hiring, Plus a Grant & a Scholarship

Seattle Author Daudi Abe Explores Hip Hop’s Political Roots and Seattle Rappers’ Cultural Influence

by Beverly Aarons


Crumbling brick buildings litter a once thriving business district. Two-story homes blackened with soot sit boarded up and abandoned. Children find pipes and needles in sandboxes. Twenty students share five books in a freezing classroom … no heat. No food tonight, just too expensive. No new shoes — wear your older sibling’s pair and line the holes with newsprint. This is America: Late ‘70s and ‘80s. To be clear, this is America’s urban ghettos: Chicago, Detroit, Los Angeles, New York, and yes, even Seattle. One generation earlier, much of Black America fled the vicious Jim Crow south seeking safety and opportunity in the north only to find itself pinned into economic wastelands with no capital and little opportunity for growth. And it is within this context that hip hop was born. During my interview with Daudi Abe, a Seattle Central College professor and the author of Emerald Street: A History of Hip Hop in Seattle, he shared his thoughts on hip hop and its political and cultural impact. 

Abe, who was born and raised in Seattle, teaches a class on the history of hip hop at Seattle Central College. Most of his students are in their late teens and early 20s, and they have a hard time understanding the context from which hip hop was born, he said. But context is key to understanding why hip hop survived and thrived while other music genres such as disco faded into history. 

Continue reading Seattle Author Daudi Abe Explores Hip Hop’s Political Roots and Seattle Rappers’ Cultural Influence

THIS WEEK IN SOUTH SEATTLE — Blacks Making History: Storytelling & Liberation, Seattle Asian American Film Fest, Celebrating Mardi Gras, & More!

by Emerald Staff

Wed., Feb. 19:

Mothers For Police Accountability

“Mothers For Police Accountability will present to the Community the
History of Weed and Seed in CD, that lead to People Remover or Gentrification. More information call 206-380-1710 Rev. Walden.Kid-friendly

Time: 6–8 p.m.
Where: Liberty Bank Building — 1405 24th Ave
Cost: Free to attend

Continue reading THIS WEEK IN SOUTH SEATTLE — Blacks Making History: Storytelling & Liberation, Seattle Asian American Film Fest, Celebrating Mardi Gras, & More!

THIS WEEK IN SOUTH SEATTLE —Apocalipstick, Documentary Night: Soul Train, Azure Savage – You Failed Us, and More!

by Emerald Staff

Thurs., Feb. 13:

No Small Talk: Loving Black

“In partnership with the Association of Black Social Work Students at the University of Washington’s School of Social Work, this community dialogue series invites and highlights voices and ideas from across the Black diaspora on important topics that inform the individual and collective Black experience. These moderated conversations center the voices of performing artists, mental health professionals, spiritual and body workers, writers, authors and more from across the northwest.

“February’s topic is Loving Black – Discussing the interpersonal and intimate relationships between Black people. Examining love between Black families in a historical context and how it connects to now. An open space to talk about stigmas, challenges, and the sweet parts of loving each other.” 

Time: 7–9 p.m.
Where: NAAM — 2300 S. Massachusetts St
Cost: FREE (register via the Facebook event)

Continue reading THIS WEEK IN SOUTH SEATTLE —Apocalipstick, Documentary Night: Soul Train, Azure Savage – You Failed Us, and More!

THIS WEEK IN SOUTH SEATTLE — Blacks Making History, “Young, Gifted, & Black,” Lunar New Year Festivities, and More!

by Emerald Staff

Thurs., Feb. 6:

Blacks Making History: The Politics of Possibility

“In celebration of Black History Month, we’re partnering with the King County Library System and visual artist Michael B. Maine for the Blacks Making History Series! Every Thursday in February will feature a different event honoring the past, and looking towards the future in celebration of our local Black community. Join us this Thursday (Feb 6th) at 7pm for our first event, an all-star panel discussion at the Skyway Library about the evolution and endurance of Black political and social movements.

“Featured panelists include Kirsten Harris-Talley, Kelle J Brown, Dominique Davis, Brianna Thomas, and Michael Charles. The panel will be moderated by Marcus Harrison Green and Bridgette Hempstead (Founder of Cierra Sisters and Vice-President of The Emerald Board of Directors). All events are free and open to everyone! Read full panelist bios in the Facebook event description. 

Time: 7–8 p.m.
Where: Skyway Library — 12601 76th Ave S.
Cost: FREE

Continue reading THIS WEEK IN SOUTH SEATTLE — Blacks Making History, “Young, Gifted, & Black,” Lunar New Year Festivities, and More!

THIS WEEK IN SOUTH SEATTLE — Jazz Cypher ft. SCRiBE the Verbalist, Model Minority Comedy Show, Ethiopian Community Breakfast, and More!

by Emerald Staff

Wed., Jan. 29:

Jazz Cypher ft. SCRiBE the Verbalist

“Hip hop cypher backed by live jazz musicians. Hosted by SCRiBE the Verbalist with King Dre on drums and Dennis Blockman on keys. Bring your raps and your friends. Totally free and all ages. Food and drink specials all night.All-ages

Time: 6–9 p.m.
Where: Cafe Red — 7148 MLK Jr Way S.
Cost: Free to attend

Continue reading THIS WEEK IN SOUTH SEATTLE — Jazz Cypher ft. SCRiBE the Verbalist, Model Minority Comedy Show, Ethiopian Community Breakfast, and More!

THIS WEEK IN SOUTH SEATTLE — Laugh Rehab, Lunar New Year at Wing Luke, CD Community Conversation, and More!

by Emerald Staff

Wed., Jan. 22:

Indigenous Reparation and Recognition in Seattle

“Seattle is one of the wealthiest and fastest-growing cities in the nation, but that growth has come often at the expense of the Indigenous people who first lived here. In a forthcoming piece in Bitterroot and the South Seattle Emerald, writer Marcus Harrison Green examines how Native citizens in Seattle are pushing for greater representation, and how non-Native Seattle residents and officials can improve the relationship with Indigenous residents of this traditional Coast Salish territory.

“Green joins us along with Fern Renville and Russell Brooks for a panel discussion moderated by Bitterroot editor Maggie Mertens, exploring ways the city can best recognize its Indigenous roots and residents, and whether reparations should be a component of that process.

“Russell Brooks (Southern Cheyenne) is the executive director of Red Eagle Soaring Native Youth Theatre in Seattle. Marcus Harrison Green is the publisher of the South Seattle Emerald [this publication]. Rachel Heaton (Muckleshoot) is the co-founder of Mazaska Talks, a tool that supports community divestment from banks that finance fossil fuel development. Maggie Mertens is the managing editor of Bitterroot magazine. Fern Renville (Dakota) is the CEO of SNAG Productions. Robin Little Wing Sigo is the director of the Suquamish Research & Strategic Development Department and a member of the Suquamish Tribal Council.

The piece our own Marcus Harrison Green wrote, From Si’ahl to Seattle: Does a Wealthy City Owe Its First Residents Reparations?, is live on our website now. Go read it! (Then go to this talk.)

Also consider attending another upcoming event, Calling All Allies to Stand with the Duwamish Tribe! Hosted by Real Rent Duwamish, this event is an opportunity to demonstrate that “ally” is a verb.

Time: 7:30 p.m. (doors at 6:30)
Where: Town Hall Seattle — 1119 8th Ave
Cost: $5 (FREE for Youth, 22 & under)

Image by Morgan Krieg (this image has been cropped to fit this space).

Continue reading THIS WEEK IN SOUTH SEATTLE — Laugh Rehab, Lunar New Year at Wing Luke, CD Community Conversation, and More!

THIS WEEK IN SOUTH SEATTLE — South-End MLK Day Events, Vanishing Seattle Film Series, Mixed N’ Misidentified, and More!

by Emerald Staff

Thurs., Jan. 16:

Vanishing Seattle Film Series Launch: Wa Na Wari

“Vanishing Seattle is excited to launch its series of short films that take a deeper dive into the stories of legacy, resistance, and resilience behind the #VanishingSeattle hashtag!

“We are premiering with a film about Wa Na Wari – a 5th-generation Black-owned home in the Central District that creates space for Black ownership, possibility, and belonging through art, historic preservation, and connection.

“Come join us at the Wa Na Wari house for the film screening (directed by devon de Leña + Chimaera Bailey) — plus art, food, & community. The event will also feature music and performances by Yirim Seck and Ebo Barton. Learn more about WNW at www.wanawari.org.

“The Vanishing Seattle film project is supported, in part, by 4Culture/King County Lodging Tax and the Northwest Film Forum.All-ages

Time: 7–9 p.m.
Where: Wa Na Wari — 911 24th Ave
Cost: FREE

Continue reading THIS WEEK IN SOUTH SEATTLE — South-End MLK Day Events, Vanishing Seattle Film Series, Mixed N’ Misidentified, and More!

THIS WEEK IN SOUTH SEATTLE — Operation Nightwatch Community Kitchen, Pushout: Screening and Community Conversation, Restorative Social Hour, and More!

by Emerald Staff

Thurs., Jan. 9:

Artist Talk HIAWATHA D.

“An intimate evening in conversation with artist Hiawatha D. for insight behind the ‘Iconic Black Women: Ain’t I a Woman’ art exhibition at Northwest African American Museum.

*Also check out Pre-King Day: King in the Wilderness Film Screening (Sun., Jan. 10).

Time: 7 p.m.
Where: NAAM — 2300 S. Massachusetts St
Cost: $10 (free for members)

Continue reading THIS WEEK IN SOUTH SEATTLE — Operation Nightwatch Community Kitchen, Pushout: Screening and Community Conversation, Restorative Social Hour, and More!