Tag Archives: News

Washington State Expands Unemployment Eligibility, Increases Weekly Payment by $600 Through Federal CARES Act

by Carolyn Bick


Washingtonians who were previously unable to claim unemployment may now find themselves eligible for benefits.

At a press conference on April 16, Washington State Gov. Jay Inslee and Washington Employment Security Department Commissioner Suzi LeVine announced an expansion to the state’s unemployment benefits program by implementing certain parts of the federal CARES Act, a response to the novel coronavirus pandemic. 

Continue reading Washington State Expands Unemployment Eligibility, Increases Weekly Payment by $600 Through Federal CARES Act

Washington State Schools will Stay Closed through End of School Year, Gov. Jay Inslee says

by Carolyn Bick


Washington State Gov. Jay Inslee announced at an April 6 press conference with State Superintendent Chris Reykdal that he is extending school closures through the end of this school year in June, as the number of cases of novel coronavirus in the state begins to peak.

Continue reading Washington State Schools will Stay Closed through End of School Year, Gov. Jay Inslee says

Inslee asks manufacturers to step up in fight against novel coronavirus, addresses possible stay-home and eviction moratorium extensions

by Carolyn Bick

Though he didn’t formally commit to an extension of the current emergency stay-home order or the current eviction moratorium, Washington State Gov. Jay Inslee said in a televised press conference on April 1 that an extension on both remains likely. He also said the state’s manufacturers need to step up in the fight against the virus.

“We know this month could be decisive in this effort, both in terms of our nation’s response and our state’s response against COVID-19. This is, perhaps, the decisive moment that we are facing,” Inslee said.

Continue reading Inslee asks manufacturers to step up in fight against novel coronavirus, addresses possible stay-home and eviction moratorium extensions

The future of journalism rests in the hands of the people

By Carolyn Bick

It’s no secret that journalism is in peril.

Over the course of 2019, journalism has lost 7,200 jobs. And these jobs weren’t just from small, struggling newsrooms hungry for ad revenue and eyeballs. They were also from big, digital powerhouses that were expected to be the wave of the future –– places like the Huffington Post, Buzzfeed, Vice, and even Gannett-owned papers that pepper the nation’s smallest towns. Even Seattle publications weren’t safe: Seattle Magazine’s publisher, Tiger Oak Media, just filed for bankruptcy, its debts falling somewhere between $1 million and $10 million.

It was this bleak atmosphere in which panelists Marcus Harrison Green, Erica C. Barnett, Matt Gertz, and moderator David “Goldy” Goldstein tried to find some hope, during a discussion hosted at Town Hall Seattle and sponsored by Civic Ventures on the chilly evening of Oct. 8.

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South Seattle candidates talk community needs in Capitol Hill evening forum

by Jake Goldstein-Street

Metropolitan King County Council candidates, including Councilmember Larry Gossett and his challenger Girmay Zahilay, as well as Seattle City Council candidates, like South Seattle’s Tammy Morales, discussed human services and social justice in an evening forum on Sept. 19 at the Seattle World School in Capitol Hill.

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Nickelsville and LIHI Standoff Reaches Three Months Amid Calls for Mediation

by Aaron Burkhalter and Carolyn Bick

Nickelsville’s Scott Morrow has spent his days in the kitchen tent of the tiny house village on Martin Luther King Jr. Way South and South Othello Street. At night, he sleeps on a table in a nearby canopy tent known as “Fisher-Price Suite,” where residents store toys for children living there.

Continue reading Nickelsville and LIHI Standoff Reaches Three Months Amid Calls for Mediation

Seattle Could See More Backyard Cottages and Mother-In-Laws — What Does that Mean for Housing Affordability?

by Aaron Burkhalter

Four years ago, the city of Seattle first began the process of lifting restrictions on mother-in-law apartments, basement apartments, backyard cottages and other accessory dwelling units.

These structures and housing add-ons are often known by different acronyms: ADUs (Accessory Dwelling Units) and DADUs (Detached Accessory Dwelling Units). Setting the legislative alphabet soup aside, these are basically residential structures or apartments that share space inside or on the same property as single family homes. In a city where housing is scarce and single-family homes take up a disproportionate share of the land, allowing more of these could make a difference.

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Calls for support for Muslims after terrorist attack on New Zealand mosques

(This article was originally published on The Seattle Globalist and has been reprinted with permission.)

by Globalist Staff

Local, national and international groups are calling for support for Muslims after a terrorist attack against two mosques at Christchurch, New Zealand, killing 49 people and injuring dozens more.

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News Gleams: Viadoom Fizzled; Minimum Wage Had Minimal Impact on Groceries

collected by Emerald staff

Viadoom’s lessons for an environmentally sustainable future

Activist organization Transit Riders Union has said that the closure of the Highway 99 Viaduct has shown that Seattle commuters are prepared to embrace public transit and bicycling, shifting people to a more environmentally sustainable modes of transportation.

Continue reading News Gleams: Viadoom Fizzled; Minimum Wage Had Minimal Impact on Groceries

HSD Staffers, Community Seek Racial Equity In Human Services Department Director Appointment

by Aaron Burkhalter

City staffers from the Human Services Department, community members, and activists say that Mayor Jenny Durkan sidestepped the city’s own procedures and race-equity process in the appointment of Jason Johnson as the director of the Human Services Department (HSD).

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