Tag Archives: Nurturing Roots

The South End Guide to Reducing our Carbon Footprint: Plant-Based Eating

by Mark Van Streefkerk


Just a few weeks ago we sweated through the hottest June temperature in Seattle’s recorded history. Heat in the triple digits can be dangerous, especially for vulnerable populations and the unhoused. The heat wave prompted the City to coordinate cooling stations — including libraries, spray parks, and beaches — as June 28 climbed to a record 108 degrees, capping a three-day stretch of triple-digit temperatures. The heatwave also affected plenty of non-human life. In Vancouver, B.C., June’s heatwave led to the deaths of 1 billion sea animals. Such staggering numbers could mean dire consequences for ocean life and interdependent ecosystems. 

The main reason for Seattle’s increasingly warming temperatures (overall, Seattle has warmed by 2 degrees since 1900) is climate change. Climate change happens when greenhouse gasses trap heat and warm the planet. According to the Environmental Protection Agency: “Human activities are responsible for almost all of the increase in greenhouse gasses in the atmosphere over the last 150 years. The largest source of greenhouse gas emissions from human activities in the United States is from burning fossil fuels for electricity, heat, and transportation.” 

A carbon footprint is a calculation of how much greenhouse gasses a person, or population, generates. You can calculate your own carbon footprint at The Nature Conservancy. (It’s super-interesting!) Scientists have been sounding the alarm on climate change for decades, and although there is much to be done on a global scale to change the course of the climate crisis, the decisions we make in our everyday lives are some things we do have control over. 

The Emerald is exploring changes that South End residents can make to reduce our carbon footprint in a new series of articles. In this first installment, we’re looking at how eating low on the food chain is not only more sustainable for the planet, it also plays an important part in the health of our communities and food-justice movements. 

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Photo Essay: For Community Organization ‘Got Green,’ Earth Day is Every Day

by Susan Fried


It was a perfect day to celebrate Earth Day on Thursday April 22, and Got Green, an organization that has been fighting for climate justice in its own unique way since its inception in 2008, celebrated by organizing a full day of events. The day included a garden work party with Nurturing Roots, canvassing Beacon Hill and Rainier Beach, holding a virtual event with WA BLOC for 300 Rainier Beach High School Students, and having a community dialogue with Got Green and the Duwamish River Clean-up Coalition.

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Red Barn Ranch Gets One Step Closer to Potential Black Ownership

by Jack Russillo


Southeast of Seattle, in unincorporated King County near Auburn, sits a nearly 39-acre parcel of wild land and outbuildings. Currently called the Red Barn Ranch and owned by Seattle Parks and Recreation (SPR), the property has been everything from a summer camp to a conference center to a farming education program. For the last three years, though, it’s sat empty. To some Black leaders in Seattle, this property could be exactly what the community needs to move toward an equitable model for Black-led land ownership that helps the Black community thrive. 

Several community voices have been lobbying since the summer of 2020 for the City of Seattle to transfer the Red Barn Ranch property to Black ownership. Who the land is sold to is ultimately up to SPR, but a leading candidate to take on the task of stewarding the land is Nurturing Roots, an urban farm located in Beacon Hill. 

“People have asked me if I wanted to own it, but no, I want it to be all of ours,” said Nyema Clark, the founder and director of Nurturing Roots, during an interview with the Emerald in October. “All of us should have a share, and that share should never be able to be sold. You could pass it down to other generations, but you couldn’t make money off of it. We want to make a legitimate model that lasts.”

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Community Rallies Behind Farm Stand Hit by Four Consecutive Arsons

by Ben Adlin


When Kevin Nguyen’s independent produce stand in South Seattle was set ablaze last week, his first reaction was to close up shop and leave the city. It was the fourth time in the past month that a fire was intentionally set on the property — part of a recent string of arsons around Rainier Avenue South — and Nguyen’s patience was wearing thin.

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