Tag Archives: Photo Essay

Counterprotesters Far Outnumber Those in Support at Seattle ‘White Lives Matter’ Rally

by Susan Fried


What was supposed to be part of a nationwide “White Lives Matter” protest at Westlake Center on April 11 turned out to be a “Picket against white supremacy!” Organized by local community groups, the event was attended by close to 100 people who were there to “stand up to racists and fascists.” The Seattle “White Lives Matter” non-event mirrored other planned rallies across the country — NBC News reported that the rallies, which were hyped up by organizers as events that would make “the whole world tremble,” ended up being busts when the turn-out on Sunday was much lower than organizers had anticipated.

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PHOTO ESSAY: Filipino American ‘Die-in’ Demands Justice for Activists Killed in the Philippines

by Ronnie Estoque


“Makibaka! Huwag matakot! [Dare to struggle! Do not be afraid!]” was a chant that rang through the air on Sunday, April 11. Unified local Filipino American members of the organizations Bayan PNW, Malaya Seattle, and the International Coalition for Human Rights in the Philippines gathered at Seafood City in Tukwila on Sunday for a die-in protest and rally. Organizers focused on demanding justice for the March 7 killing of nine Filipino activists in the Calabarzon region of the Philippines, an incident that is being called Bloody Sunday.

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PHOTO ESSAY: Hing Hay Protest in Wake of Atlanta Shooting

by Maile Anderson


For the second time this month, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders and their allies gathered at Hing Hay Park in Chinatown-International District (CID) to protest the rise in anti-Asian hate in Seattle and across the U.S. This time, protesters came together in response to the Atlanta shootings on Tuesday which took the lives of eight people, six of whom were Asian women: Soon Chung Park, Hyun Jung Grant, Suncha Kim, Yong Yue, Xiaojie Tan, and Daoyou Feng. Delaina Ashley Yaun and Paul Andre Michels were also killed in the shooting. Saturday’s midday rally at Hing Hay Park, “Kids vs. Racism,” was organized by 10-year-old Seneca Nguyễn (Tia Nguyen), a fifth grader at Louisa Boren STEM K-8. Nguyen wanted to take a stand by organizing and amplifying a youth message against hate. He felt it was important to hold the protest in the CID. Dozens of children, youth, and young people were in attendance.

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PHOTO ESSAY: Hundreds Gather to Protest Recent Rise in Anti-Asian Violence

by Maile Anderson


Hundreds showed up for a community organized rally and march “We Are Not Silent” in Hing Hay Park this weekend, on Saturday, March 13. Protestors gathered to condemn the recent spike in anti-Asian violence nationwide, including the assault of Noriko Nasu, a Japanese language high school teacher, last month in Seattle’s Chinatown-International District (CID). The crowd listened to heartfelt words from youth speakers, community leaders and elders, former and currently elected officials, before marching through the CID to Little Saigon and back to Hing Hay Park.

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PHOTO ESSAY: Franklin High School Club Responds to Vandalism With BLM Art

by Susan Fried


On the afternoon of Feb. 26, as unpredictable weather loomed overhead, the students in Franklin High School’s (FHS) Art of Resistance & Resilience Club hung their latest project outside, a group of handmade signs celebrating Black lives and social justice. They attached the project to the fence next to the school’s mural honoring the Seattle Chapter of the Black Panthers, which was vandalized late last year.

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UNBOUND: Nature Heals

by Carolyn Bick


In this special photography series, Emerald writer and photographer Carolyn Bick shares some of the challenges of being a breaking news reporter and investigative journalist and how they find release, healing, and resilience in nature.

I am bad at being vulnerable.

I am equally bad at asking for help, asking to take a break, saying no — you know, those classic perfectionist traits. These traits are really good at getting a person through the sprint … but what about the marathon?

This year, Reader, I nearly burned out. I think it took longer than anyone who was concerned about me expected, but it was quite a shock for me to find myself crying on the floor of my closet and unable to figure out why. I’d been doing the requisite therapy sessions (that’s what you’re supposed to do in a pandemic, right?), signed up for a Calm membership, kept up with my regular morning exercise, and (grudgingly) agreed to take time off when my publisher and managing editor said I needed to.

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PHOTO ESSAY: Seattle Protests in Global Solidarity With Dehli Farmers

by Maile Anderson


On Sunday morning, December 13, the Sikh Student Association at UW and Blacklisted Since ‘84 organized an event and march at the Space Needle in downtown Seattle. Nearly 250 people gathered for speeches given in Hindi and English to educate and bring attention to three new farm bills recently approved by both houses of the Indian Parliament and approved by President Narendra Singh Tomar. The three agriculture bills have stirred protests throughout India and around the world. Opponents of the bill believe these new laws are “pro corporate farming” and against small farmers who are the backbone of Indian culture. Speakers included International League of Peoples’ Struggle (ILPS).

(Photo: Maile Anderson)
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Skyway Residents Gather to Highlight Black-Led, Community-Driven Solutions

by Carolyn Bick


When Elijah L. Lewis was born in Skyway Park two decades ago, he carried his mother’s grief over his father’s death inside himself.

“My father had been walking my little sister down the stairs when he had collapsed. At the time, we did not have a phone, because of the inequities we were suffering because of the poverty mindset … and the reality that we have to face,” Lewis said, describing how difficult it was for his family to summon medical aid. “My six-year-old [sibling], my nine-year-old sister, and my 10-year-old brother and mother, witnessed my father, who was a Black man, turn purple and die in front of their face. … We did not have any financial stability left when he passed, so we had to struggle.”

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Safety Not Stigma: A Pandemic Portrait Campaign to Fight Racism

by Sharon H. Chang


COVID-19 Safety Not Stigma is a portrait campaign by South Seattle photographer Sharon H. Chang to combat increased racism against people of color during the coronavirus pandemic; raise awareness about the disproportionate impacts of the coronavirus on communities of color; and prioritize safety instead of stigma by the public. Portraits show Asian and Black Americans wearing masks and are shared online with humanizing words, as well as news and updates. The campaign, supported by 4Culture, launched on social media April 7. You can see more on Sharon H. Chang’s Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

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PHOTOS: Youth football league brings community, families to the field

By Susan Fried

Stepping onto the field at a Northwest Premier Junior Football and Cheer League game, one might think the whooping, cheering crowd is watching a National Football League championship. But they’re not. They’re cheering on tiny children, bobble-headed in football helmets.

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