Tag Archives: Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival

Poor People’s Campaign: Called to Lead — Part 3

by Chardonnay Beaver


In 1967, after fighting against Jim Crow segregation and winning many civil rights victories for Black and Brown Americans, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and many others called for a “revolution of values” in America.

The Poor People’s Campaign marks Dr. King’s philosophical shift from civil rights to human rights — demanding a new consciousness amid the threat of war, poverty, racial discrimination, and white supremacy. This inclusive fusion movement would unite all races through their commonality of struggle, to create solutions that would revolutionize American values.

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Black Women and Girls Center Their Voices at #SayHerName March

by Sharon H. Chang


“The most disrespected person in America is the black woman. The most unprotected person in America is the black woman. The most neglected person in America is the black woman.”

—Malcolm X

Speakers call out and loud voices respond, rising behind a sea of black, orange, and white face coverings. “Protect Black women!” “Enough is enough!” “All Black lives matter!” Some of the dark face coverings have white writing that reads Black Lives Matter and Say Their Names. Hands clutch homemade protest signs made of cardboard and paper. It was pouring earlier and the grass is wet with morning rain. But no one seems to care as their shoes and socks slowly soak. Everyone is far too busy listening to unapologetic Black women and youth speak electric truth to power. 

Continue reading Black Women and Girls Center Their Voices at #SayHerName March