Tag Archives: Ronnie Estoque

PHOTO ESSAY: ‘Day In Day Out Festival’ Features Local Artists and Food Vendors

by Ronnie Estoque


Seattle Center’s Fisher Pavilion was filled with music from live performances and the smell of delicious food Saturday, Sept. 4, for the first ever “Day In Day Out Festival,” a small-scale music festival organized by Daydream State, which is also known for organizing the annual “Capitol Hill Block Party.” Guests were required to bring their vaccination card or negative COVID-19 tests to enter the venue.

The limited crowd slowly trickled into the venue around 3 p.m. and consisted largely of young people from the Seattle area. A blow to the event was the absence of two notable artists. Portland rapper Aminé had to cancel his performance after testing positive for COVID-19, while Seattle’s Parisalexa also pulled out of the line-up due to a non-COVID-19 illness. Local singer and rapper LIVt replaced Parisalexa’s slot. Local rapper Sol replaced Aminé’s performance for the day.

Food vendors like the South End’s The Original Philly’s and Central District’s The Fish Box fed hungry music fans into the evening. Headliners Travis Thompson, a Burien rapper, and Haitian-Canadian record producer DJ Kaytranada both drew enthusiastic crowds.

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The Unlikely Partnership Supporting South Seattle Youth Through Forest Science

CHOOSE 180 Interns Research Hemlock Tree Mortality at Seward Park 

by Ronnie Estoque


Paul Shannon, a forest steward at Green Seattle Partnership and member of Friends of Seward Park, heard Sean Goode speak on the radio last summer, after the police killing of George Floyd, about the importance of community support for racial justice. Inspired and impressed by Goode’s segment, Shannon reached out and became a volunteer for Goode’s organization, CHOOSE 180, which supports young people who are disproportionately impacted by the criminal justice system in King County. 

As the executive director of the organization, Goode seeks to provide job training for youth participants in CHOOSE 180. This summer, for example, they offered an entrepreneurship internship that taught business basics. But Shannon’s expertise offered a unique opportunity to the youth in the program. He just wrapped up leading a six-week paid internship program with CHOOSE 180 to provide three of their interns the opportunity to learn a different kind of trade. Specifically, they worked to assess the die-off of hemlocks, the Washington State tree, in the old-growth forest at Seward Park.

“The outdoors has been largely colonized,” said Goode. “And because it’s been colonized, and it’s been a place of discomfort for many Black and Brown folks, it’s not a natural partnership for us to lean into when we’re thinking about ways to support young people and job training.” 

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The Elleby Foundation Brings Youth Basketball Camp to the Community

by Ronnie Estoque


Basketball runs deep in the local Elleby household. In 2011, Garfield High School honored Bill Elleby as a legend for his contributions as a player during the late 1980s. He went on to play for the University of California, and the team made two National Invitation Tournament appearances and one NCAA appearance during his four years as a Golden Bear. Raised to love the game of basketball by his late uncle, Carl Ervin, Bill was a Cleveland High School and Seattle University star and was eventually drafted by the Seattle Sonics in the 1980 NBA Draft. Four decades later, the next generation of basketball talent in the family, C.J. Elleby, is officially in the NBA as the Portland Trail Blazers guard.

“The moment he [C.J.] got drafted, it was kind of surreal, I had tears fill into my eyes because I know how hard he’s worked,” C.J.’s father, Bill Elleby, reminisced. “And I know how hard it is to get to that dream — for players to get drafted.”

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Grab a ‘Bite of Pinoy’ — Filipino Food and Culture in the South End This Saturday

by Ronnie Estoque


On Saturday, Aug. 21, “Bite of Pinoy” (BoP) will be occurring at Rainier Playfield (3700 South Alaska Street) from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. The event will feature food vendors such as Filipino Styled Peanuts, Mekenie Pampangga’s Special, and Hungry for Grace. 

The main organizers behind BoP include Tootsie Borromeo and Jon Madamba both of Jack N Poy Productions and VXVIII Events. Other organizers who have helped this event become a reality for the community include Bel Borromeo, Rein Angeles, Aileen Angeles, Francis Halili, and Rowena Halili.

Tootsie and Madamba had sought an opportunity to bring the Filipino community together due to the annual Pista sa Nayon festival being hosted on a virtual platform this year. They initially struggled to find a venue for the event, but when the City of Seattle reached out to find food vendors for their annual Big Day of Play event, the “Bite of Pinoy” was born as a collaborative effort.

“It is so important to have events such as this not only to expose and exchange cultural ideas among different cultures but also to bridge the gap between generations amongst the Filipino community,” Tootsie said.

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After 10 Years, Jill Mangaliman’s Departure From Got Green Leaves a Lasting Legacy

by Ronnie Estoque


Last month, Got Green, a South Seattle-based grassroots organization that works towards environmental, racial, and economic justice made a big announcement. The organization’s executive director, Jill Mangaliman, transitioned out of their position after a decade. Mangaliman joined Got Green as a volunteer in 2009 and has left a lasting impact on the organization through their leadership on various campaigns and programs over the years.

“I definitely consider myself like, you know, I call it a late bloomer,” Mangaliman said regarding their long-time community organizing work. They had grown up in a Filipino household where the discussion of politics rarely occurred, so they consider their road to activism to have begun much later in their life.

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