Tag Archives: Social Justice

PHOTOS: Students Unveil Mural Commemorating Seattle Black Panther Party

Story and Photos by Susan Fried

Hundreds of people filled the Franklin High School commons on Nov. 9 to await the official unveiling of the Franklin High School Art of Resistance and Resilience Club’s 40-foot mural commemorating the Seattle Chapter of the Black Panther’s 50th Anniversary. Members of the Art of Resistance & Resilience, a social and environmental justice-oriented art club at Franklin, have been working on the mural since January and were able to display a portion of it at the SCBP 50th Anniversary Celebration in April.

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Missing the Deadline: Address Climate Change Now; People of Color Are Feeling the Impact

by Natalie Barry

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released a new report on October 6, and it’s far more dramatic than any that came before it. It offers a hard deadline for climate action; just 12 years. It recognizes that climate change is already happening, and that we are currently dealing with just the tip of the iceberg of what’s ahead.

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OPINION: Passionate Testimony Brightens a Bleak Seattle Budget

by Geov Parrish

Sept. 23, hundreds packed Seattle City Council chambers and an overflow room for their first chance to offer public testimony on Mayor Jenny Durkan’s proposed 2019-20  budget, and potential council amendments to it. Some 140 people and groups signed up to offer testimony in what turned out to be a frequently emotional four-hour marathon that hopefully left council members — at least those who weren’t looking at their phones all evening — a lot to think about. To her credit, Councilmember Sally Bagshaw chaired the hearing with a notably fairer and more restrained hand than council President Bruce Harrell employs in contentious council meetings.

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Opinion: Say Yes to City of Seattle Proposition 1, Renewing Our Commitment to Seattle’s Kids

by Elizabeth Whitford, CEO of School’s Out Washington, Jessica Werner, Executive Director of Youth Development Executives of King County, Erin Okuno, Executive Director of Southeast Seattle Education Coalition

It is an exciting time for children, youth, and families in Seattle. The future holds promise with a new superintendent, city government and the school district working more closely together, and community support for critical educational programs. However, Seattle Public Schools still faces many challenges in its commitment to closing opportunity gaps and ensuring excellence in education for every student.

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One Woman’s Lifetime Vision for Education Becomes a Community’s Gift

by Melia LaCour

At the tender age of 5, Dr. Debra Sullivan knew the education system was flawed. She vividly recalls receiving a stern reprimand from her teacher after reading an above-grade reading level book to her classmates.

“I don’t want you bringing books like this to school anymore,” the teacher said. “When you read that far ahead of the other children, you make them feel bad about themselves.”

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South End Stew: Conversation with Myself

by June BlueSpruce

I am full of despair.

I am feeling wild hope.

Everything I have worked for all my life is in jeopardy.

I have worked all my life to be ready for this moment.

Our country has lost its heart and soul.

Our country, founded on genocide and slavery,
lost its heart and soul long ago.
Our national wounds are exposed for all to see.
Now we have a chance to heal them.

Authoritarianism is more powerful than our movements for change.

Nothing is more powerful than love.
Our adversaries are weak. They have no roots. They will fall.

I feel depressed.

I know how to manage depression and have resources:
loving wife, community, bountiful garden, medications,
ancestors who have my back.
I know what to do. Time to get up off the couch and do it.

I feel powerless.

Those who would destroy our democracy want me to feel powerless.
Then their work is done.
As a white middle-class US citizen, I have more power
than most people in this country and the world.
I need to use it for the good of all.
We call on deep spiritual power that is visible only in its effects.

We are at a critical moment. National leaders who should stand up are sitting on their hands, or worse.

I have no control over anyone’s actions but mine. In this emergency,
how will I stand up to those who wield power like a weapon?
How will I join with others?

Our Constitution, our democracy is at risk. This has global implications.

The founders of our country, all white men of European descent, knew
our democracy was a radical experiment that might fail.
With their strengths and flaws, they did the best they could.
We still don’t know the outcome.
We have the opportunity to determine it.

These are the questions that matter:

What are we called to do?

How will we meet this moment?

Experience Stories of Community Resistance at Social Justice Film Festival

by Guy Oron

The seventh annual Seattle Social Justice Film Festival begins Friday with a focus on immigrant rights, Black liberation, and indigenous futurism. The week-long festival features a number of local and global films. Showings will take place from Oct. 5 to 14 at locations throughout the city, including  the Northwest African-American Museum and Duwamish Longhouse.

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