Tag Archives: South End Guides

A collection of guides for South End folks!

A Summer Guide to BIPOC-Focused Markets

by Fiona Dang


Foregrounding inclusivity and community, BIPOC-led markets across the greater Seattle area have been thriving in recent years, and many will be showcasing local talent this summer. These markets have sought to redress the staggering absence of markets centering BIPOC entrepreneurs and to reduce the often high barriers to entry such as application and vendor fees, bias in selection processes, and lack of mentorship. These markets support diverse communities of vendors with businesses that range from food and drinks to arts and crafts, apparel, beauty, and even performance. Here is your guide to several BIPOC-led markets in the Seattle area and beyond.

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Juneteenth 2022: A Guide to Celebrating in the South End

by Amanda Ong


Juneteenth has been celebrated for over a century and a half by African Americans as the day in 1865 when news reached across the country that slavery was abolished. Though the holiday has only been recognized by the state and federal government since 2021, Seattle communities have already been celebrating for years.

The Emerald has rounded up Juneteenth events from across the South End, listed here in chronological order.

Keep an eye on this guide for possible updates!

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A South End Guide to Pride 2022

by Patheresa Wells


Pride season is upon us, with events celebrating LGBTQIA+ people happening all over the city. Pride events are held in June to mark the anniversary of the Stonewall riots, which were in response to the police raid of a gay bar in New York City in 1969. While Stonewall wasn’t the first riot in response to police violence against LGBTQIA+ people, it is commonly thought of as a pivotal moment in the fight for queer, transgender, and gender-diverse rights in the U.S. While decades of activism have increased the rights of LGBTQIA+ people, it’s important to note that activists and community members are still fighting for these rights today, especially considering the record number of proposed anti-LGBTQIA+ bills this year.

Just as important as activism and protest is celebration and joy, and this year, some of the bigger in-person Pride events are back after pandemic restrictions of the past two years. The 16th Annual PrideFest will be taking place on Capitol Hill on June 25 and at Seattle Center on June 26, and the Pride Parade will take place downtown on June 26. But Pride isn’t just for Capitol Hill and Seattle — there are also numerous Pride celebrations throughout the South End. 

Below is a resource guide, listed in order of occurrence, for events happening throughout the South Seattle area, or events centering BIPOC communities.

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Guide to Local Events to Celebrate Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

curated by Emerald Staff


Seattle is about as far as you can get from Atlanta, where the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was born and led this country’s civil rights movement. But Seattle activist Larry Gossett would argue no city compares to Seattle’s fervor for celebrating Dr. King:

“Remember, y’all: No other citizenry from any city in our country, has been as able as Seattle’s activists — especially its Black, other People of Color, and progressive white community leaders — in attracting thousands of folks from all walks of life to come together every year to pay tribute to Dr. King’s legacy.”

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Halloween 2021 in South Seattle: A Ghostly Guide to Local Events

by Emerald Staff


With the spookiest night of the year fast approaching, the South Seattle Emerald has gathered some haunted happenings around the South End here so you, friends, and family can spend a scary (and safe!) Halloween together. From pumpkin hunts to trunk or treats, there’s something here for all the ghosts, goblins, and ghoulies to enjoy all weekend long.

Check back to this post as we continue to add more events that we hear about! If we missed an event and like us to add it, fill out our event form here.

🎃🎃Last updated on Wednesday, Oct. 20.🎃🎃

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The South End Guide to Reducing Our Carbon Footprint: Recycle and Reuse

by Mark Van Streefkerk


A majority of the waste in our landfills doesn’t need to be there. According to a 2019 King County Waste Characterization and Customer Survey Report, over half of what we throw away could be redirected. “Seventy percent of the material that is going to our landfill could be recycled, composted, or reduced,” explained Heather Trim, executive director of Zero Waste Washington. “The vast result of what’s going to our landfill doesn’t need to be going to our landfill.” 

In August, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released a report showing that the effects of climate change are “widespread, rapid, and intensifying,” and that “strong and sustained reductions in emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gases would limit climate change.” Greenhouse gasses are responsible for raising the temperature of our planet. A warming planet is also partly responsible for increasing the severity of wildfires on the west coast in the past few decades. Extreme weather events like hurricanes or heat waves have also been linked to climate change, which also affects the most marginalized and socially vulnerable.   

Holding corporations and governments responsible to reduce greenhouse emissions is essential to limit the effects of climate change, and there are also changes we can make in our own lives that are relatively simple — and save money — to help offset our own carbon footprint. 

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The South End Guide to Reducing Our Carbon Footprint: Making Electricity Carbon-Neutral

by Mark Van Streefkerk


Most people probably don’t think about the fact that they’re burning fossil fuels when they flip on a light switch or plug their phone in to charge, but it’s a fact of life — unless you’re getting electricity from Seattle City Light, that is.

While 60% of electricity in the U.S. is derived from fossil fuels like coal, petroleum, and natural gas, Seattle’s electricity is about 85% hydro-powered. City Light owns seven hydropower plants in Washington that provide green, renewable energy that powers our lights, computers, dishwashers, refrigerators, electric cars, and other household appliances. 

“City Light is engaged in preparing for climate change to ensure that we can continue to provide safe, reliable, affordable, and clean electrical services to our customers,” said Crista Chadwick, City Light’s energy advisor supervisor. 

“In 2005 [we were] the first carbon-neutral utility in the nation. Our power remains carbon-free, primarily because we generate about 85% of our power from hydroelectric dams,” she said. 

That’s a big win for our goal of reducing our carbon footprint. (Curious about where the other 15% of power comes from? 6% is “Unspecified,” meaning it’s not required to identify the generating source in the wholesale power marketplace, 5% is nuclear, 4% is wind, and 1% is biogas.) So if you live in Seattle or get your electricity from Seattle City Light, congrats, you already have a head start toward reducing your carbon footprint!

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The South End Guide to Reducing Our Carbon Footprint: Laundry Day

by Mark Van Streefkerk


Early last week a study released by the United Nations revealed the alarming state of climate change, which is accelerating at a faster rate than we previously thought. The effects of greenhouse gasses are warming up the planet, sea levels around the world are rising (about 8 inches on average between 1901 and 2018), and heat waves and wildfires are becoming increasingly more frequent in areas that historically never had these issues — as anyone living in Seattle in the last few years can attest to. 

In an NPR article, Ko Barrett, the vice chair of the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, mentioned a couple of key takeaways from the report: “It is indisputable that human activities are causing climate change,” and “[i]t is still possible to forestall most of the most dire impacts, but it really requires unprecedented, transformational change.”  

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The South End Guide to Reducing Our Carbon Footprint: Fighting Plastics

by Mark Van Streefkerk


Did you know that only 9% of plastic is actually recycled? That percentage even includes the wide range of plastics we put in the recycling bin. Plastic bottles are recycled consistently, but everything else — milk jugs, plastic wrappers, the clamshells that package your deli sandwich — ends up in landfills, incinerated, or shipped overseas to stagnate in heaps in Southeast Asian countries like Malaysia or the Philippines. 

Worldwide, plastic invariably ends up in oceans and waterways, polluting the ecosystem, consumed by fish and other sea animals, which in turn are eaten by us. Even if you don’t eat seafood, plastics are everywhere. In fact, there is so much plastic in the world that we literally eat, drink, and breathe in microplastics. It’s estimated that we could be ingesting up to a credit card-size of microplastics a week. What that plastic consumption means for our bodies is still undetermined, although plastic chemicals can act as endocrine disruptors and could have harmful effects on hormones and reproductive systems. It’s a sobering reminder that we can’t outrun or outsource our waste. 

In this installment of our ongoing series on how to reduce our carbon footprint, we’ll take a look at what makes plastics so harmful, what the good news is, and how a group of South End youth are educating their neighbors on plastic waste. 

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The South End Guide to Reducing Our Carbon Footprint: Safety to Walk and Roll

by Mark Van Streefkerk


For Seattle to meet its carbon-neutral goal, we need to take an honest look at how we get from one place to another. Burning fossil fuels, like gasoline and diesel for motor vehicles, emits greenhouse gasses. In Seattle, roadway transportation makes up 40% of greenhouse gas emissions. For the U.S., emissions from transportation account for 29% of total greenhouse gases. Reducing our reliance on cars and gasoline plays an important role in reducing our carbon footprint. The good news is that everyday choices to walk, bike, scoot, or roll instead of driving can significantly reduce the greenhouse gasses we produce. Earlier this year a study found that ditching the car for one day out of the week can reduce personal carbon dioxide emissions by a quarter. Swapping even one trip in a car with walking or rolling makes a significant impact over time. 

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