Tag Archives: Susan Fried

Seattle Pride Parade Returns After a Two-Year Hiatus

by Susan Fried


Thousands of people gathered on 4th Avenue in Downtown Seattle on Sunday, June 26, for the 46th annual Seattle Pride Parade. The largest parade held annually in Washington had been on hiatus for the last two years due to COVID-19 restrictions, making this year’s parade all the more special. Over 200 organizations and groups participated in this year’s parade, and crowds of jubilant, colorfully dressed people lined the streets to cheer them on. 

Continue reading Seattle Pride Parade Returns After a Two-Year Hiatus

PHOTO ESSAY: Honoring Our Black Wall Streets Expo Celebrates Black-Owned Businesses in Seattle

by Susan Fried


On a rare almost-sunny day in May, the Africatown Community Land Trust honored the 101st anniversary of the Black Wall Street massacre in Tulsa, Oklahoma, by celebrating Black business and entrepreneurship in Seattle. 

Continue reading PHOTO ESSAY: Honoring Our Black Wall Streets Expo Celebrates Black-Owned Businesses in Seattle

Seattle Stands in Solidarity With Buffalo

by Susan Fried

Content Warning: This article contains discussion of gun violence.

Editor’s Note: It seems incomprehensible that while still reeling from the Buffalo, New York, killings on May 14, another tragedy took place yesterday when 19 elementary school children and two teachers were slain in Texas. The epidemic of gun violence and the targeting of Black, Brown, Indigenous, and People of Color is one of the most devastating and horrific elements in our country. The Emerald recognizes these harrowing events and acknowledges the difficulty in reporting on what feels like a constant cycle of tragedy. 

After recently wrapping up our partnership with the Beloved campaign, which examines gun violence as a public health crisis, we will remain committed to covering this issue of critical importance to our local communities and beyond.


A week after an 18-year-old self-proclaimed white supremacist shot 13, killing 10 Black, mostly elderly people in Buffalo, New York, Seattle held two vigils on Saturday, May 21, to honor those whose lives were taken.

Continue reading Seattle Stands in Solidarity With Buffalo

PHOTO ESSAY: Fourth Annual ACES Showcases the Work of Over 100 Artists of Color

by Susan Fried


The fourth annual Artists of Color Expo and Symposium (ACES) took place over the weekend of April 2–3, both virtually and in person at LANGSTON (formerly Langston Hughes Performing Arts Institute). The BIPOC-led and community-curated event featured the work of over 100 BIPOC artists, live performances, film screenings, artist talks, as well as workshops and opportunity tables. 

Continue reading PHOTO ESSAY: Fourth Annual ACES Showcases the Work of Over 100 Artists of Color

PHOTO ESSAY: Sculpture of Seattle Artist Dr. James W. Washington Jr. Unveiled

by Susan Fried


The large, unfinished room in the Central District apartment complex Midtown Square was filled with local artists and art supporters on Saturday, Feb. 26, for the official unveiling of a 6-foot-tall bronze sculpture of renowned Seattle sculptor and painter Dr. James W. Washington Jr., created by Barry Johnson

Continue reading PHOTO ESSAY: Sculpture of Seattle Artist Dr. James W. Washington Jr. Unveiled

Celebration of Africatown Plaza Groundbreaking Rings in New Affordable Housing

by Elizabeth Turnbull, photos by Susan Fried


Last Saturday, Feb. 5, local leaders and community luminaries participated in a groundbreaking ceremony to celebrate a new building project, named Africatown Plaza, which is intended to bring more affordable housing to the Central District. 

“I think this moment just signifies what’s possible, when we have a thought, we come together around that thought, and then we take that and rally and push it forward to make it real,” K. Wyking Garrett, the CEO of Africatown Community Land Trust, said in an interview with Converge Media.

“A lot of times it looks very bleak but hopefully this is just a small light, a small candle, and if we keep lighting candles and then put our candles together, we can create a different situation.” 

Continue reading Celebration of Africatown Plaza Groundbreaking Rings in New Affordable Housing

PHOTO ESSAY: Murals — Accessible Art for Everyone

by Susan Fried


There are hundreds of murals all over the City of Seattle, and some of the city’s most iconic reside in South Seattle. Several of those murals have become cherished parts of the neighborhood. Recently, after the Martin Luther King Jr. mural on the wall outside of Fat’s Chicken & Waffles was defaced on MLK Jr. weekend, the community, including the mayor, vowed to work together to repair the damage. Similarly, when the mural celebrating the Seattle Chapter of the Black Panther Party that hangs on the fence in front of Franklin High School was vandalized in 2021, some of the members of Franklin’s Art of Resistance and Resilience Club and several local artists repaired it.

The murals of South Seattle are an eclectic group with depictions of everything from Sasquatches, dogs, and cats to expressions of solidarity, artistic renderings of the Seattle skyline, marine life, and dancers. The art is accessible to anyone driving or walking along Rainier Avenue or Martin Luther King Jr. Way.

Continue reading PHOTO ESSAY: Murals — Accessible Art for Everyone

PHOTO ESSAY: 40th Annual Martin Luther King Jr. March Demands Truth in Education NOW

by Susan Fried


Despite the omicron variant surge, hundreds of people, including lots of families and children, came out for the 40th Annual Martin Luther King Jr. Rally and March on Jan. 17 at Garfield High School. This year’s theme was Truth in Education NOW. Many of the issues King was dealing with in his lifetime are still present today, including voting rights, workers’ rights, and income inequality, and those issues were touched on by several of the speakers and by the signs carried in the march.

Continue reading PHOTO ESSAY: 40th Annual Martin Luther King Jr. March Demands Truth in Education NOW

PHOTO ESSAY: Santa’s Back

by Susan Fried


I’ve taken photos of kids with Santa Claus for many years, including a brief stint as a Santa photographer at the downtown Seattle Nordstrom in the mid ’90s. Christmas hasn’t officially arrived for me until I see a child staring up into the eyes of Santa, trying to remember what they want him to bring them for Christmas. 

This year, Santa made an appearance at Rainier Avenue Radio’s First Annual Holiday Bazaar in the Columbia City Theater. Unlike last year, a fully vaccinated Santa was able to spend a little time with each child, receiving their Christmas wish lists and allowing their family to get a quick photo. 

When I first started taking photos of children visiting Santa, it was pretty rare to see a Black Santa in our city. Thankfully, we now have Santas nearly as diverse as the South End community. 

Continue reading PHOTO ESSAY: Santa’s Back

PHOTO ESSAY: MLK60, Honoring the Legacy of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

by Susan Fried and Phil Manzano


Seattle celebrated the 60th anniversary of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s visit to Seattle over the weekend in song, recognition, and celebration. 

The three-day event, held by the Northwest African American Museum (NAAM), hosted Dr. King’s oldest son, Martin Luther King III, at the Fairmont Olympic Hotel, where America’s civil rights leader of the 1960s stayed on his only visit to Seattle.

Saturday, Nov. 6, at Garfield High School where Dr. King spoked to packed audiences 60 years ago, NAAM announced the first group to be inducted into the Circle of Elders, “exceptional Black community leaders over the age of 75 who have led and won victories in the struggle for civil rights, social equity, and opportunity in Seattle’s Central District and greater Pacific Northwest.”

Other events included a prayer vigil at Mount Zion Baptist Church featuring local clergy and culminated in King III’s keynote address at the University of Washington. 

“Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s most inspirational affirmation was hope for a better tomorrow and a brighter future for everyone. It was that hope that mobilized the Civil Rights Movement, and it is that very same hope that continues to shape efforts today to create Dr. King’s vision for a more equitable society,” states NAAM’s MLK60 website.

Continue reading PHOTO ESSAY: MLK60, Honoring the Legacy of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.