Tag Archives: The Seattle Globalist

Indigenous Voices Across the Americas

by Josie Jensen and Jesús Zamora

The Seattle Globalist was a daily online publication that covered the connections between local and global issues in Seattle. The Emerald is keeping alive its legacy of highlighting our city’s diverse voices by regularly publishing and re-publishing stories aligned with the Globalist‘s mission. 


Indigenous peoples around the world have been fighting to protect their ancestral lands, languages, and cultures from being erased by colonialism for generations.

In Seattle, on the unceded territory of the Duwamish, Suquamish, and Tulalip people, there are countless movements for Indigenous liberation past and present. These range from the fish wars of the 1960s and ’70s to the Duwamish fight for federal recognition to movements such as Idle No More and 350 Tacoma that work to protect Indigenous lands from environmental degradation to movements calling for justice for missing and murdered Indigenous women to organizations working to uplift Indigenous artists and preserve Indigenous culture such as the Duwamish Longhouse, Yəhaw̓ Indigenous Creatives Collective, and more. 

Similar work is being done by Indigenous people around the world. I got to witness these similarities in a recent trip to Ecuador where I participated in a program organized by Amigos de Las Americas centering Indigenous rights and food justice.

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PHOTO ESSAY: Filipino Community Mobilizes Against Philippine President at Othello Park

by Ronnie Estoque

The Seattle Globalist was a daily online publication that covered the connections between local and global issues in Seattle. The Emerald is keeping alive its legacy of highlighting our city’s diverse voices by regularly publishing and re-publishing stories aligned with the Globalist‘s mission. 


On Saturday, July 31, BAYAN Seattle and Malaya Movement coordinated a rally and carnival to launch the Duterte Wakasan Na Movement, which seeks the resignation of Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte for human rights violations in the country. Human Rights Watch reports that extrajudicial killings in the country — often committed under the guise of a “war on drugs” — have increased dramatically during the pandemic. 

The weekend event also included several bouncy houses for kids, food and games, and local performances from artists as well as group dancing. Several notable speakers in attendance included Miss Washington Maricres Castro and Washington State Sen. Rebecca Saldaña. Both expressed support for local community organizers.

“Under current President Duterte, the unjust system in the Philippines participates in suppressing dissent both by weaponizing the law to facilitate human rights abuses and by failing to enforce legal protections,” said Saldaña, who has served as a sub commissioner on Investigate PH — an organization currently conducting independent investigations of human rights violation in the country.

Last April, the Emerald published a photo essay that documented protests at Seafood City in Tukwila from the same organizations that led Saturday’s event at Othello Park. 

The Pacific Northwest is home to one of the largest Filipino populations in the country.

Continue reading PHOTO ESSAY: Filipino Community Mobilizes Against Philippine President at Othello Park

Seattle Activists Stand in Solidarity With Colombian Protests

by Kayla Blau

The Seattle Globalist was a daily online publication that covered the connections between local and global issues in Seattle. The Emerald is keeping alive its legacy of highlighting our city’s diverse voices by regularly publishing and re-publishing stories aligned with the Globalist‘s mission. 


Colombian activists in Seattle are working tirelessly to spread awareness about mass protests in their home country. 

Countrywide protests in the South American country were sparked in late April thanks to a tax reform bill proposed by right-wing President Iván Duque, which would have placed extreme taxes on essential items such as eggs, milk, and gasoline. The legislation would have hit working-class and middle-class families hardest, who were already struggling before COVID-19 hit the country.

Colombia is one of the most economically unequal countries in the world. A 2018 report from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development said that it would take 11 generations for a poor Colombian to approach the average income in Colombia, the longest time period out of all 30 countries in the report.

The COVID-19 pandemic has only exacerbated this divide, shrinking Colombia’s economy by almost 7% and increasing the poverty rate to more than 42%

“I shouldn’t be forced to leave my country just for a chance at a better future,” Evelyn Carvajal, a Colombian social worker based in Medellín told the Emerald.

Continue reading Seattle Activists Stand in Solidarity With Colombian Protests

PHOTO ESSAY: Tegaru Community March Against Continued War in Tigray

by Ronnie Estoque

The Seattle Globalist was a daily online publication that covered the connections between local and global issues in Seattle. The Emerald is keeping alive its legacy of highlighting our city’s diverse voices by regularly publishing and re-publishing stories aligned with the Globalist‘s mission. 


Last Saturday, the local Tegaru community gathered from across the Tigrean Community Center on East Yesler Way to protest the continuing war in the Tigray region of Ethiopia. Last December, the Emerald covered a candlelight vigil that was organized by the community to honor those killed in a conflict that began Nov. 4 after the Ethiopian government of Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed accused the Tigray People’s Liberation Front of ambushing a federal military base.

According to protestors in attendance, the situation since then has only intensified, with persisting blackouts in Tigray preventing families from checking up on their relatives that have been fleeing the conflict.

Speeches were given at the protest by several local community members, which were then followed up by a march down East Yesler Way. Local youth led the march by holding banners up front. “Stop ethnic cleansing in Tigray!” was a chant that rang through the streets as protestors marched, alongside calls for international intervention to help halt the war. According to Al Jazeera, thousands have died in the conflict thus far with around two million people having to flee their community as refugees. Protest organizers also encouraged attendees to financially support their people in need during this time by donating to a GoFundMe set up by the Tigray Development Association.

Continue reading PHOTO ESSAY: Tegaru Community March Against Continued War in Tigray

‘Yai Nin’ Explores Powerful Thai Matriarch Ninlawan Pinyo

by Beverly Aarons

The Seattle Globalist was a daily online publication that covered the connections between local and global issues in Seattle. The Emerald is keeping alive its legacy of highlighting our city’s diverse voices by regularly publishing and re-publishing stories aligned with the Globalist‘s mission. 


Stern and powerful matriarchs are central to most Thai families — they’re not big on hugs, but they will “yell at the people that need to be yelled at in your defense,” filmmaker Champ Ensminger said during a telephone interview. Ninlawan Pinyo, Ensminger’s grandmother and the central character in his short documentary Yai Nin, is a matriarch who defies all Western stereotypes of what it means to be an Asian woman — she’s feisty, confident, and the owner of the successful Naem Pinyo sausage factory in Chiang Mai, Thailand. But it wasn’t until after Ensminger moved back to Chiang Mai in 2013 that he began to witness the breadth of Pinyo’s personal power and her willingness to wield it to protect her family.

“The neighbors [thought] I was with a bunch of white backpacker folks trying to grow weed,” Ensminger said of the day his grandmother rescued him from Thai immigration police. The truth was that he was working with the nonprofit Documentary Arts Asia to build a theater and exhibition space. But nonetheless, he found himself and the other volunteers covered in dirt from the construction site and sulking in front of the immigration office. Pinyo arrived at the office and demanded to see the manager. 

Continue reading ‘Yai Nin’ Explores Powerful Thai Matriarch Ninlawan Pinyo

Activists Delay Ship Operated by Israeli Firm ZIM From Unloading at Port of Seattle

by Guy Oron

The Seattle Globalist was a daily online publication that covered the connections between local and global issues in Seattle. The Emerald is keeping alive its legacy of highlighting our city’s diverse voices by regularly publishing and re-publishing stories aligned with the Globalist‘s mission. 


On Saturday morning, June 12, around 250 protestors rallied on Harbor Island to block the Port of Seattle from unloading cargo from an Israeli shipping company’s vessel, the ZIM San Diego. Gathering at 5:30 a.m., protestors marched to the entrance of Terminal 18 and blocked the road, disrupting traffic for about an hour. 

After an hour, protestors declared victory after hearing from sources within the longshore workers’ union that the ship would not be worked on that day.

Organizers are targeting ZIM as part of the Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions movement (BDS) for its role in supporting the state of Israel. The company, once owned by the state, is now a publicly traded corporation and is the tenth largest shipping company in the world.

The BDS movement aims to isolate the state of Israel and complicit corporations economically and politically until it upholds equal rights for the Palestinian citizens of Israel, ends the military occupation Palestine and the siege of Gaza, and guarantees the right of return for Palestinian refugees displaced from their homes. ZIM, along with a number of other companies, is on the boycott list. 

Continue reading Activists Delay Ship Operated by Israeli Firm ZIM From Unloading at Port of Seattle

With ‘Born to Win,’ Draze Pays Homage to Zimbabwean Ancestry

by M. Anthony Davis

The Seattle Globalist was a daily online publication that covered the connections between local and global issues in Seattle. The Emerald is keeping alive its legacy of highlighting our city’s diverse voices by regularly publishing and re-publishing stories aligned with the Globalist‘s mission. 


After success from his last single, “Black Wealth,” that not only accumulated over 2 million views across social media platforms, but launched multiple Black marketplace events that showcased Black businesses nationwide, hip-hop emcee and musician Draze is back with another new single, “Born to Win.” 

Both singles will be included in an untitled album set to release this summer. “Born to Win” pays homage to Draze’s Zimbabwean roots with a new sound that he calls “Ancestral Art.” 

“Being a Black man, and being from both Seattle and Zimbabwe, it was the merging and the meshing of these two worlds,” Draze explains. On “Born to Win,” these two sounds are merged seamlessly. The track opens with Ngonidzashe, who is Draze’s younger cousin, singing in their native language. His melody smoothly washes over hip-hop drums, before he transitions to English and is followed by Draze who delivers a verse that explores nuances of being a Zimbabwean growing up in Seattle through lines like, “ I remember the third grade them n***** they had waves, I had them beady bees you know the Zimbabwean grade, so they threw shade.” 

Continue reading With ‘Born to Win,’ Draze Pays Homage to Zimbabwean Ancestry

March Draws Attention to Genocide in Ethiopia’s Tigray Region

by Chloe Collyer

The Seattle Globalist was a daily online publication that covered the connections between local and global issues in Seattle. The Emerald is keeping alive its legacy of highlighting our city’s diverse voices by regularly publishing and re-publishing stories aligned with the Globalist‘s mission. 


May Day is a historic and celebrated day for Seattle to honor its labor movement. This May 1, at Volunteer Park, a few runners and dog walkers passed by a group of “Black Bloc” protesters carrying handmade signs and East African flags. Black Bloc, the term used to describe the black-clad protesters usually associated with anti-capitalist, anarchist movements, was defined by one park-goer as “people who just want to smash something,” but the sincerity of their cause on Saturday was clear: They were there to protest the genocide taking place in the Tigray region of Ethiopia.

Whether you call it a civil war, ethnic repression, or genocide, it’s clear people are suffering. Millions of Tigrayans have lost their jobs, faced violence and drone strikes, or been thrown out of refugee camps by the Ethiopian government and simply scattered across the countryside. First-hand reports describe sexual violence being used as a daily weapon of war. International aid has been cut off. It is, by all accounts, a nightmare. 

Continue reading March Draws Attention to Genocide in Ethiopia’s Tigray Region

PHOTO ESSAY: Filipino American ‘Die-in’ Demands Justice for Activists Killed in the Philippines

by Ronnie Estoque

The Seattle Globalist was a daily online publication that covered the connections between local and global issues in Seattle. The Emerald is keeping alive its legacy of highlighting our city’s diverse voices by regularly publishing and re-publishing stories aligned with the Globalist‘s mission. 


“Makibaka! Huwag matakot! [Dare to struggle! Do not be afraid!]” was a chant that rang through the air on Sunday, April 11. Unified local Filipino American members of the organizations Bayan PNW, Malaya Seattle, and the International Coalition for Human Rights in the Philippines gathered at Seafood City in Tukwila on Sunday for a die-in protest and rally. Organizers focused on demanding justice for the March 7 killing of nine Filipino activists in the Calabarzon region of the Philippines, an incident that is being called Bloody Sunday.

Continue reading PHOTO ESSAY: Filipino American ‘Die-in’ Demands Justice for Activists Killed in the Philippines

Local Burmese Community Protests Violent Military Coup in Burma/Myanmar

photos by Alex Garland

The Seattle Globalist was a daily online publication that covered the connections between local and global issues in Seattle. The Emerald is keeping alive its legacy of highlighting our city’s diverse voices by regularly publishing and re-publishing stories aligned with the Globalist‘s mission. 


Editor’s note: On Friday, March 26, about 50 protesters, including members of Seattle’s Burmese community, held a rally near the Space Needle in support of protesters opposing the return of military rule in *Burma/Myanmar. 

On February 1, in response to a landslide victory by Aung San Suu Kyi and her National League for Democracy (NLD) party, the Myanmar military staged a coup d’etat and arrested Suu Kyi and other leaders of her party. Dozens of protesters in Burma/Myanmar opposing military rule have been killed over the past two months, and this past weekend, at least 114 civilians (including several children) were killed during a violent crackdown across Burma/Myanmar.

The Seattle rally, organized by Save Burma/Myanmar Seattle, WA, featured songs and speeches (including some in Burmese), and many supporters at the rally flashed the three-finger salute from The Hunger Games that has been adopted by protesters opposed to military rule in the Southeast Asian nation. Members of the Burma/Myanmar Student Association at UW also participated in the Seattle event. 

Continue reading Local Burmese Community Protests Violent Military Coup in Burma/Myanmar