Tag Archives: The Station

The Station Hopes to Avoid Being ‘One of the Closing POC Businesses’

by Marti McKenna


Editor’s Note: This article has been updated to include information about a GoFundMe fund benefitting The Station.

For 10 years, Beacon Hill coffee and community hub The Station has been known to many in the South End as a place to get great coffee and snacks, meet friends, work, and hold community discussions. In that way, it’s like a lot of small, neighborhood cafes, though The Station has been a particular haven for People of Color and the space itself is a vehicle for activism on behalf of marginalized people. Luis Rodriguez and Leona Moore-Rodriguez have created an entity in The Station that extends beyond its walls and into the community itself. And now they’re turning to the community they’ve helped and asking for help to stay open.

Continue reading The Station Hopes to Avoid Being ‘One of the Closing POC Businesses’

Four Cafes and a Pandemic: How South End Coffee Hubs Survive, Thrive, and Fuel Community Amid COVID

by Ari McKenna (photos by Zion Thomas) 


The owners of four beloved South Seattle cafes — Beach Bakery, Cafe Avole, Cafe Red, and The Station — recount the stories of their opening, discuss the impact of the pandemic, and look cautiously towards the future.

Beach Bakery

Amy O’Connell of Beach Bakery (Photo: Zion Thomas)

Beach Bakery’s proprietor, Amy O’Connell, has been around the block and back in food service, whether it’s waiting tables, cooking diner food, bartending, washing dishes, or cooking gourmet cuisine. She’s sought further insight, travelling on a shoestring budget to experience the food cultures of various countries in Europe and provinces of Mexico. Amy’s also been to hell and back. Fortunately for the South End, she eventually figured out exactly how she wanted to express herself in the industry: “The more down to earth, the more comfortable food is, the more comforting food is, the better I am with it, and the better I am sharing it with other people.”

Continue reading Four Cafes and a Pandemic: How South End Coffee Hubs Survive, Thrive, and Fuel Community Amid COVID

Life on the Margins Episode 2: The Better Angels of the COVID-19 Pandemic

by Enrique Cerna, Jini Palmer, and Marcus Harrison Green


Amid the death and turmoil of the coronavirus pandemic, people are stepping up to aid their community with humanity and compassion. We introduce you to coffee shop owner Luis Rodriguez and volunteer Maria Lamarca Anderson who show us why giving is so important in these difficult times. Plus, we begin a new segment “For Real Though” that examines society’s absurdities, ridiculousness, and injustices that are leaving us in a state of disbelief, and making us ask “but, for real though?”

Continue reading Life on the Margins Episode 2: The Better Angels of the COVID-19 Pandemic

Small Businesses Fight to Survive Amid COVID-19 Chaos

by Jessie McKenna


Gov. Jay Inslee announced on Sunday an emergency proclamation ordering closure of many businesses across the state ranging from bars and restaurants to gyms and recreational venues through at least March 31. A similar order was issued by King County Executive Dow Constantine in accordance with the statewide mandate. Continue reading Small Businesses Fight to Survive Amid COVID-19 Chaos

Dozer’s Warehouse & Gallery, an Artist’s and Art Lover’s Dream Realized

First Show, “3 Queens,” Opens Feb. 21

by Jessie McKenna

Update: Due to the snow, the original Friday, Feb. 8 opening of 3 Queens,” has been rescheduled for Thursday, Feb. 21.

Crick Lont, aka Dozer of Dozer Art and Dozer’s Warehouse, has been quietly curating upcoming shows, painting walls and drizzling on the funky linoleum floors a la Jackson Pollock to create an art space on Beacon Hill. He’s partnering with local artists to put their mark on the storefront, pro bono; Leo Shallot’s trademark calligraphy ribbon design in gold on black wraps around the storefront.

“That’s what’s so great about this place, people just want to be a part if it,” Lont said.

Continue reading Dozer’s Warehouse & Gallery, an Artist’s and Art Lover’s Dream Realized

Beyond the Block Party: Beacon Hill Coffee Shop Is Catalyst for Social Change

by Marilee Jolin

You’ve probably heard about The Beacon Hill Block Party that happened two weekends ago.  Our neighborhood’s free summer music festival, created and organized by The Station café on Beacon Hill, has gotten a lot of media attention.  With coverage from The Weekly, The Stranger, The Globalist and, of course, The Emerald, The Station is basking in its “2 or 3 seconds of fame” as owner and Block Party organizer Luis Rodriguez calls it.  Continue reading Beyond the Block Party: Beacon Hill Coffee Shop Is Catalyst for Social Change

As Beacon Hill Adapts to Change, So Does the Station Block Party

by Ellis Simani

As an influx of new capital, infrastructure, and suburban transplants continue to change the faces of several neighborhoods throughout South and Central Seattle, a new generation of artists, activists, and community leaders took center stage on Beacon Hill—giving voice to the experiences of many from Seattle’s inner-city neighborhoods. Continue reading As Beacon Hill Adapts to Change, So Does the Station Block Party