Tag Archives: Transformative Justice

OPINION: Why Can’t Justice Punish and Heal at the Same Time?

by Marcus Harrison Green

(This column is co-published with The Seattle Times) 

Yonas Seifu and Devon Adams have desperately sought wholesale healing from a justice system capable of supplying them only scraps. 

In 2006, Seifu nearly died after a bullet randomly struck him in the head while he sat on the couch at a Lake City house party hosted by University of Washington fraternity brothers. 

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OPINION: Love and Accountability

by Meg McGuire

(Adapted from a sermon delivered to the First Unitarian Universalist Society of San Francisco, February 28, 2021.)


What does the word “accountability” evoke for you?

Accountability feels to me like one of those words that we hear all the time but might struggle to define. Like one of those words that’s used so much that its meaning starts to get obscured. One those words that sees a lot of traction, but very little precision or careful unpacking … and one of those words that may carry a connotation that doesn’t have much to do with its actual meaning — at least not the way I understand it. What does the word accountability evoke for you?

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Seattle Children’s Hospital’s Version of Accountability Fails to Prioritize Healing of Odessa Brown Families

by Adana Protonentis and Jasmine M. Pulido


In the weeks since Dr. Ben Danielson’s resignation from the Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic (OBCC) was made public, there has been an outpouring of shock, grief, anger, and loss from the community he served. Running consistently through these messages have been calls for accountability. But what does that mean?

“True accountability is not only apologizing, understanding the impact your actions have caused on yourself and others, making amends or reparations to the harmed parties; but most importantly, true accountability is changing your behavior so that the harm, violence, abuse does not happen again.” — Mia Mingus

In the United States, accountability is often transactional. Our criminal legal system is an example: Someone commits a criminalized act, they are assigned a punishment (jail or prison time, restitution, community service), they complete the punishment, and the case is closed. There are collateral consequences that continue to punish the “offender” for years afterward, and those who were harmed rarely find closure. The wound cannot heal. In this version of accountability, the community is not centered. There is a transaction between a system and an individual. The individual is punished, but no one is made whole.

Continue reading Seattle Children’s Hospital’s Version of Accountability Fails to Prioritize Healing of Odessa Brown Families