Tag Archives: Troy Landrum Jr.

OPINION | Generational Knowledge Is Just as Important as Wealth

by Troy Landrum Jr.


As a Black male in the United States, the concept of generational wealth has been as foreign to me as knowing the original language of my ancestors. The forethought to look beyond present circumstances and financially plan for the generation of family that will come after you is a privilege. One typically reserved for those who don’t share the same skin complexion as me and those among us who the American dream was actually meant for. The concept of generational wealth reveals a universal truth among millions of Black people in the United States — a devastating history full of violence, purposefully lost history, white supremacy, and unfulfilled promises. A history that has prevented Black people from looking to the future with the hope that their next generation of family would be financially taken care of. 

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Max Hunter Addresses Black Male Writers and Readers in ‘Speech Is My Hammer’

Catch Hunter and local artist Moses Sun in conversation at Elliott Bay Books on Wednesday, Jan. 18.

by Troy Landrum Jr.


Literature has unexpectedly built the cobbled path of my life. It has bridged the crevasse between purpose and the spiritual, the space in between that creates the creative path I hope to continue on throughout my days. As a Black man, there is a dichotomy in that. At one point in American history, to be Black and to read or write was an illegal act. These laws were set in place to control Black people, to keep them from understanding the world around them; the laws were ingrained so Black people could be totally reliant on the white faces that enslaved them. For a Black person to wield the power to read and write was more powerful than any weapon that could inflict bodily harm. Fear rested in the hearts of the enslaver: fear of riots, of coups, of power being overthrown. To possess these forbidden abilities meant white supremacy’s days were numbered.

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The Legacy of the Turkey Bowl Week of Service Continues With the 8th Annual Event

by Troy Landrum Jr.


“I don’t ever want to be able to help, and not help.” Those words from Cortez Charles signify the foundation and the mission of the 8th Annual Turkey Bowl Week.

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D’Vonne Pickett Jr. — ‘Prolific, So Gifted!’

by Troy Landrum Jr.


“Prolific, so gifted!” Those are the first words we hear from the resounding lyrics of the late great Nipsey Hussle’s award-winning Victory Lap album. If you know of his life and work, you know exactly how impactful those words are to his legacy. If you don’t know, then it would be my honor to tell you. 

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S.U.B.E. Founder Jeffrey Cheatham Initiates Seattle’s First-Ever Children’s Book Day

by Troy Landrum Jr.


My writing journey began approximately eight years ago — possibly 30-something years, if the journey includes reading memorable books and making up stories in my head through my middle-grade years and adolescence. Specifically during that eight-year span I had the honor of meeting a lot of wonderful people along the way who shared those same hopes of making something out of the stories that floated around in their heads. 

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OPINION | Remembering Candace Smiley, the Legendary MzTwist

by Troy Landrum, Jr.


Our physical bodies fade. Our spirits transition. Our legacies lay down roots. The legacies of Black entrepreneurs have been planted in the Northwest soil for many decades. These histories and legacies are being unpacked and recognized for the first time in front of our very eyes. The history of these individuals represents to us, as Black people, the trees that were already growing in our backyards. While the whole world is currently reading about these legacies, these are the stories that are passed down to us, whispered in our ears by our elders and ancestors from a very young age. These stories are a part of our fabric, our DNA. They have been one of the reasons for our survival. They are the stories that we pass down — our folklore of the heroes who pushed against resistance and produced progress, not just for an individual, but for communities. 

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Local Barber Michael Smith Jr. Carves Out a Path For Himself During the Pandemic

by Troy Landrum, Jr.


“It’s time for a cut, my man.” 

On the weekends that I stayed with my dad when I was a kid, those are the words he said to me every time I stepped into his car. Those weekends were full of excitement, but the most consistent experience was our time at the barbershop. The memories that we made in the barbershop have stayed with me well into my adult years. They have shaped me and taught me many lessons. I believe the most important lesson I learned is this: to find the right barber is to find a friend. Someone whom you can trade ideas and experiences with, someone who will become part of a sacred sustaining culture that will be here for you, your children, and eventually, their children too. 

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