Tag Archives: Voices

OPINION: They’re Raising Grandkids With Little Help, and During a Pandemic. Can’t We Lend Them a Hand?

by Marcus Harrison Green

(This article is copublished with The Seattle Times.)


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Most days, the massive unfairness of the world cannot crush Ollie Reeves. 

Most days, the 76-year-old calls on her faith in God and family to help her raise her two grandchildren, Montrey, 14, and Destiny, 10, amid a pandemic.

Most days, the retiree plunges into her savings, accumulated as a Boeing shuttle driver, to pay for food, clothes, and medical bills.

But occasionally, there are days when things get too much and Reeves can do nothing but lock herself in her bedroom and cry. 

“My grandkids will say ‘Grandma, why’d you lock the door?’ But they know I need a quiet moment and they just let me be,” she said.

Continue reading OPINION: They’re Raising Grandkids With Little Help, and During a Pandemic. Can’t We Lend Them a Hand?

OPINION: There Was More Police Accountability in Washington State During Jim Crow Than Today

by Jordan Chaney


The other day I was driving a little faster than what the speed limit called for and a motorcycle cop pulled me over. As he approached my driver’s side window, he tapped the middle of his chest to make me aware of his body cam, and he announced that he was recording the traffic stop. In that moment, I thought my life could end. I imagined him blowing my brains out through the passenger side seat and window. So when he asked for my ID, I made sure to go through my “P.O.P.s” (the pull-over-protocol that I taught my son when he got his driver’s license): pray, be polite, move as slowly as possible, keep your hands and wallet visible at all costs because it could cost you your life.

Continue reading OPINION: There Was More Police Accountability in Washington State During Jim Crow Than Today

By Refusing to Forgive Student Debt, Biden Rejects a Tool to Help Black Americans

by M. Anthony Davis


At President Biden’s recent town hall, he was asked a direct question by a voter, who is currently in federal student loan debt, about Biden’s plans regarding the forgiveness of at least $50,000 in student loan debt. Biden gave a straightforward “no” in answer in a response in which he suggested the funds should be used to support early education instead, and he went on to describe his reluctance to assist Americans who have degrees from elite institutions. Biden did reiterate his commitment to free community college.

The student asked the president: “The American dream is to succeed — but how can we fulfill that dream when debt is many people’s only option for a degree?” This statement stands out to me. As a Black American, I know many graduates, who like myself, were forced to take on student loans in pursuit of a degree that would hopefully set us on a path toward building generational wealth for our families. But how will we succeed if we are stuck with insurmountable debt as a reward for our pursuit of a professional career?

Continue reading By Refusing to Forgive Student Debt, Biden Rejects a Tool to Help Black Americans

OPINION: We Must Continue Lifting the Voice of Every Womxn

by Shasti Conrad


In 2020, we saw people across the country make their voices heard with an urgency America hasn’t witnessed in decades. We marched in cities from coast to coast to express the need for social justice in our country. We advocated for change, pushing for more equity and inclusion.

The core of our chorus in protest after protest, “Black Lives Matter,” is a demand for action — an insistent call to finally tend to the overdue work of elevating Black voices and centering Black experiences. 

That call was heeded at the ballot box here in Washington State, with more Black candidates elected than ever before.

Now that we have transitioned into 2021, it is more important than ever to keep building that momentum beyond electoral politics. We must continue to lift our voices and advocate for change throughout our society. 

Continue reading OPINION: We Must Continue Lifting the Voice of Every Womxn

OPINION: Mariners — Rotten in the Front Office, Rotten on the Field

by Glenn Nelson, contributing columnist


Major League Baseball (MLB) has a race problem. Its least accomplished member, the Seattle Mariners, has an even worse one. I don’t think it’s a coincidence that the most woeful franchise in all of professional sports also has a longstanding awkwardness — to put it kindly — with race.

Continue reading OPINION: Mariners — Rotten in the Front Office, Rotten on the Field

OPINION: A Mother’s Call to Action for State Lawmakers

by Scarlett To


As the Washington State Legislature responds to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, Washington families continue to struggle with multiple crises, and we need action from our leaders now. As a local mother and advocate, I am urging lawmakers to take bold and swift action to get immediate relief to communities and families.

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OPINION: Mather’s Racist Comments Are Only Further Proof of Baseball’s Failures

by Maggie Mertens, contributing columnist


Kevin Mather said he was “tired” of paying an interpreter for Japanese pitcher Hisashi Iwakuma, who wanted to return to the Seattle Mariners as a coach. Iwakuma’s English, Mather said, is “terrible.” And prospective outfielder Julio Rodriguez? 

Continue reading OPINION: Mather’s Racist Comments Are Only Further Proof of Baseball’s Failures

OPINION: I Got Vaccinated to Support My Community

by Roy Fisher


When I first thought about getting vaccinated, it wasn’t about whether I would or not, it was about when. I did not want to be part of the initial rollout, figuring some kinks would need to be worked out. I likened it to getting the newest cell phone when they’re released. The first edition consistently seems to have something not quite right but then they get it figured out over subsequent releases. I thought the vaccine would follow a similar course. Let’s get the first year under our belts and see what kind of outcomes there are. No way did I think there would be an effective vaccine available in 2020. 

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OPINION: More Will Die From Covid Without Meaningful Change to Health Care

by Asqual Getaneh, MD


In February 2020, International Community Health Services (ICHS) was the first of the nation’s nearly 1,400 federally qualified health centers — serving 30 million people, most of them low-income immigrants and refugees — with a positive COVID-19 diagnosis.

Our staff have seen the tragic costs of a pandemic that has infected more than 100 million people worldwide and claimed more than 2 million deaths. So, when the first doses of the Moderna vaccine rolled through our doors on Dec. 23, we felt ready.

Continue reading OPINION: More Will Die From Covid Without Meaningful Change to Health Care

Day of Remembrance 2021: Another Time, Another Place

by Stanley N Shikuma


Executive orders have been in the news a lot lately. Did you know there have been over 15,000 executive orders signed by 46 presidents in the history of the United States? More than 3,700 were signed by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt (FDR) alone. Yet how many of those executive orders do you remember by number? 

The only one I can think of is Executive Order (EO) 9066. 

Continue reading Day of Remembrance 2021: Another Time, Another Place