Tag Archives: Women’s History Month

PHOTO ESSAY: ‘That’s What She Said 206’ Expands Installation for Women’s History Month

by Susan Fried


Seattle photographer Susan Fried takes us on a tour of the images displayed in the art installation That’s What She Said 206, including the latest in the series. This street artist prefers to remain anonymous, so we’ll refer to them by their Instagram handle, thatswhatshesaid206.

Portraits of Angela Rye, Ella Fitzgerald, and Amelia Earhart, accompanied by quotes by the women, are three of many created by artist thatswhatshesaid206 to honor the contributions of women. The artist started the project in 2020 in honor of Women’s History Month but continued to create new pieces throughout the year.
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Five Powerful Women Who Inspire Me as a Young Woman

by Alexis Mburu


Whenever we speak of women in history or of the present and their impact, it is impossible to provide an exhaustive list. However, something that we always sense, whatever the list, is the power that women carry and embody. That power includes the energy and life that women can bring to a room, a movement, or enterprise. Women are the backbone of society and shape us all in ways we’re aware of and otherwise. Today, I bring you five women who inspire me, as a young woman, for a multitude of reasons. Hopefully, these stories can help you reflect on the power that women bring to your life, not just for Women’s History Month, but for every day of every month.

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OPINION: Regaining a Better World for Our Women and Children

by Cindy Domingo


International Women’s Day (IWD) always reminds me of my sister, Eileen Nelson, an older African American woman who was a grocery clerk and long time Seattle resident working in Seattle’s Central Area. The year was 1999 and the place was Havana, Cuba. Eileen and I were on a national delegation hosted by Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF), an international women’s peace organization that has worked for over 60 years to end the US blockade against Cuba.  

The day after we arrived in Havana was International Women’s Day and everywhere we went we were greeted with “Happy International Women’s Day,” flowers, songs, smiles and hugs. Two women from our delegation were even walking later that night along the Malecon (Havana’s sea wall) when they were approached by a Havana policeman. Surprising the fearful women, the policeman also said with a smile, “Happy International Women’s Day!” We ended that second day in Cuba feeling proud of who we were as women and the contributions that women globally have accomplished.  

However, Eileen also said something then that has remained with me over these two decades. She said to the Cuban women, “Why did I have to come all the way to Cuba to find out about International Women’s Day, especially since its beginnings had to do with women workers killed in the U.S.?”

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‘Our Voices, Our Histories’ Is a Critical Read to Understanding the Future of Asian American and Pacific Islander Women in the U.S.

by Juanita Tamayo Lott

(This article was originally published by the International Examiner and has been reprinted with permission.)


This anthology, edited by Shirley Hune and Gail M. Nomura, is a timely contribution to acknowledge, understand, and document the rich complexities of Asian American and Pacific Islander women in the 21st century. It is a fitting sequel to the pioneering 1971 Asian Women, (Asian Women, U.C. Berkeley) and the 1989 Making Waves: An Anthology of Writings by and about Asian American Women (Asian Women United of California). While the former gave voice to pioneering Asian American women — Chinese, Filipino, Japanese and Korean — the latter included South Asian, Southeast Asian, and mixed-race women. Our Voices, Our Histories is even more expansive with the formal inclusion of Pacific Islander women. 

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Honoring the Legacy and Love of Our Black Trans Women and Trans Women of Color

We celebrate and honor the legacy, labor, divinity, sacredness, and love of our Black trans women and femmes and trans Women of Color in community!

by Trans Women of Color Solidarity Network


Portrait of Jaelynn Scott, by Jiéyì 杰意 Ludden.

Jaelynn Scott

She/her pronouns

Jaelynn Scott, M.Div., is the executive director of Lavender Rights Project. Jaelynn has worked as a director of HR, operations, and education for nonprofits and religious organizations. She is an ordained minister and regularly preaches and facilitates workshops on justice and mindfulness. Jaelynn is passionate about trans liberation, sacred practices for self-care, decolonized labor practices, and mindfulness in the workplace. Jaelynn, we love you and celebrate you! Thank you for your loving leadership and cosmic commitment to Black trans liberation and healing for generations to come! 

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Rad Pacific Northwest Women and Femmes, Part 2

by Larissa McCartney


In 2020, I attempted to participate in the Instagram #100Days challenge where artists and creatives pick one theme and medium to practice for 100 days. My goal was to digitally illustrate 100 badass women and femmes of the Pacific Northwest, from all walks of life and different professions, who inspired me for a number of different reasons. I didn’t quite make it to 100, but in the end that didn’t matter! Nominations from friends, coworkers, and people on Instagram helped curate a long list of incredible individuals who contribute to and represent the PNW, influencing this great place we call home. Below are a selection of a few of these phenomenal local people along with my illustrations.


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Youth Activist Mia Dabney Is Making Waves in Seattle

by Beba Heron

(This article was originally published on the South End Stories Youth Blog and has been reprinted under an agreement.)


“I never started being an activist — it was always a part of me.” While only sixteen years old, Mia Dabney has made some impressive waves in the Seattle community. A junior at Cleveland STEM High School in Beacon Hill, she is both a prominent figure in the school community and in the larger area for her social activism.

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Rad Pacific Northwest Women and Femmes, Part 1

by Larissa McCartney


In 2020, I attempted to participate in the Instagram #100Days challenge where artists and creatives pick one theme and medium to practice for 100 days. My goal was to digitally illustrate 100 badass women and femmes of the Pacific Northwest, from all walks of life and different professions, who inspired me for a number of different reasons. I didn’t quite make it to 100, but in the end that didn’t matter! Nominations from friends, co-workers, and people on Instagram helped curate a long list of incredible individuals who contribute to and represent the PNW, influencing this great place we call home. Below are a selection of a few of these phenomenal local people along with my illustrations.

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INTENTIONALIST: Woman-Owned Businesses in South Seattle

by Kristina Rivera


Intentionalist is built on one simple idea: where we spend our money matters. We make it easy to find, learn about, and support small businesses and the diverse people behind them through everyday decisions about where we eat, drink, and shop. #SpendLikeItMatters

Women’s History Month begins this Monday, March 1, and the Intentionalist team is excited to kick off our celebration by highlighting some of our favorite woman-owned businesses in South Seattle. 

This month is all about commemorating, acknowledging, and celebrating the vital role women play in history and present day. March also marks one year since the pandemic shut down small businesses throughout Seattle, disproportionately affecting women and women of color in particular. This month, especially given the events of the past year, it’s important to continue showing up for the woman-owned small businesses at the heart of our communities.

Whether you’re into sweet, savory, or all of the above, here are three Intentionalist suggestions for woman-owned businesses you can support in the South End.

Revolutionary Women: Halisi “Tha Wizdom Wordsmith” Ali Eli

by Kayla Blau

Halisi “Tha Wizdom Wordsmith” Ali Eli is an artist, writer, advocate, community organizer, and life coach, but she doesn’t fit into any box. She’s a Seattle native and currently lives in South Seattle with her partner and five children.

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