Tag Archives: Youth

Ask a Therapist: I’m Supposed to Be Away at College but COVID Has Me Stuck at Home — How Do I Tell My Parents I Need Space?

by Roy Fisher, MA LMFT


Question: I’m an 18-year-old recent high-school grad. I was really looking forward to heading off to college this fall but because of the pandemic, my school is choosing to only offer online classes. My relationship with my parents is good, I was just looking forward to having the opportunity to be more independent and figure out who I am. I’m concerned that by staying home, we’ll all fall into the same patterns. I’m worried how my parents might react to this if I tell them how I’m feeling. Any ideas on how to have the conversation would be really appreciated.

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Quarantine From the Outside: A Photo Series of Young Energy

by Aliyah Newman

(This photo series originally appeared on the South End Stories youth blog.)


In March/April, I started a small photography project to capture some friends and mutuals during their own quarantines. I wanted to get an outside-in perspective and started out photographing by standing outside of their windows, looking in. But as you’ll notice, the perspectives change throughout different participants. Some pictures ended up being taken through FaceTime; some were taken on friends’ porches as I sat in their yard to catch up and talk; and some were strictly taken from behind the glass.

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Seattle Nativity School Brings Tuition-Free Education to the South End

by Melia LaCour


On July 1, Columbia City welcomed the Seattle Nativity School to the neighborhood. Described by staff and students as a place that “feels like family,” this Jesuit-endorsed, Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) middle school’s mission is to “break the cycle of poverty through an education that nourishes the souls and ignites leaders for love and service.” 

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OPINION: What Teachers Should Know About the Experience of Being a Black Student in Seattle Public Schools

by Ramone Johnson 


My name is Ramone Johnson and I’m 17 years old. I’m from Illinois originally, and ever since I’ve been to school out here in Washington, any situation in school has been blasted way out of proportion. I want to share my experience to help students and teachers understand each other and learn to value every student and make schools a better environment for everyone.

I started recognizing I was being treated differently as one of the only Black kids in my Seattle middle school. The school administration and security guards came as hard as they possibly could towards me. If I called out the way they were treating me differently than other students, they would call me disruptive and send me out of the classroom. It’s like they wanted to prove a point when I refused to adapt to their environment. I watched them give some students extra time to finish assignments, and they wouldn’t do the same for me. What made him better than me? We were both students that needed help. Instead, they’d treat me like a terrorist. They’d have the cop and school security guard following me around all day and blame me for things I didn’t do.

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No library card? No problem. Every Seattle Public School Student Now Has Access

by Ben Adlin


It’s no news to Seattle parents and caretakers that educating kids has become even more of a challenge since the city closed school campuses in March. Many have been asked without warning to take on the roles of teacher and childcare worker while still having to travel to essential jobs, find new employment or adapt to working from home.

A newly expanded partnership between Seattle Public Schools and the Seattle Public Library hopes to ease the transition by offering families free access to a suite of online resources. With just their school identification number, all K-12 students can now log in to the library’s digital databases and electronic media. 

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OPINION: As We Mourn the Loss of “Normal,” the Time has Come to Envision a Bold New Future for Our Schools

by Marcus Harden

(This article first appeared on Rise up For Students and has been reprinted with permission.) 


“As long as there are those that remember what was, there will always be those that are unable to accept what can be. They will resist.”

—Thanos, Avengers Endgame


I hate social distancing. There, I said it.

I believe in the power of language — I rarely use the word hate — and I fully understand why social distancing is necessary. I honor and respect the sacrifices workers are making that allow me to sit on my Ikea couch and write a blog post about hating it and the privilege that comes along with it.

Now that we’ve gotten that out of the way … every day, my heart and spirit mourns the loss of not only what was, but like so many others around me, I grieve for the lost feeling of certainty of what will be.

Continue reading OPINION: As We Mourn the Loss of “Normal,” the Time has Come to Envision a Bold New Future for Our Schools

These women entrepreneurs lead by example to empower youth, strengthen the community

By Carolyn Bick

October is National Women’s Small Business Month. Across the United States, 11.6 million businesses are woman-owned. The Emerald chatted with three Seattle-based women entrepreneurs of color about the hurdles they faced in starting their own businesses, and why they believe visibility in the community is so important.

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Black Panther Youth Empowerment Summit Spans Generations

by Susan Fried

In a room filled with an intergenerational group of people, Willard Jimerson described how at 13 he was sentenced to 23 years in prison and how that had influenced his life.

“It’s our responsibility, for some of us who came out of the graveyard and woke up to go back to that particular cemetery with alarm clocks and throw them out there to wake people up,” he said.

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The Bygone Days of the “Summer Job” and the Sharp Decline of Youth Employment—a South End Perspective

by Jessie McKenna and Marti McKenna

Summertime: Long, light-filled days and a brief respite from the overcast skies of fall, winter, and even spring here in the Pacific Northwest. It’s a time when kids are out of school and running their flip-flopped feet to the beaches of Lake Washington or their closest public pool to soak up the sun. It’s also the season when some of the youth of our communities dip their toes in the local workforce. For 40-plus years, as many as 58-percent of youth on average found employment in the summertime, but, beginning in the early ’90s, a series of recessions and other shifts in youth employment dynamics changed that.

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