Seattle Public Library’s Summer Book Bingo Starts Its Eighth Year With New Categories

by Amanda Ong


This summer The Seattle Public Library is hosting Summer Book Bingo — a summer reading program for adults, now in its eighth year. And anyone can participate! Just pick up a bingo card at any Library location, or download one online in English or Spanish, and start reading to fill out the categories. Each bingo placement offers a different reading challenge. You can read books in five categories to achieve bingo — a line across, up, down, or diagonally — or in all 25 squares for blackout.

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OPINION: How the Overturn of Roe v. Wade Will Uniquely Impact Sex Workers

by Laura LeMoon


In 1973, SCOTUS heard the case of Roe v. Wade, which essentially brought into question the legality of an abortion ban in the state of Texas at the time. Back then, abortion was really only accessible in 13 states and only under certain circumstances; the remaining states outlawed abortion except to save the life of a pregnant woman. Right-wing lawmakers have been chipping away at sex workers’ privacy for years now, and while sex workers’ rights activists have been sounding the alarm to the general public for a while, I believe there is something we can all still do to support sex workers now that Roe has been overturned. The first thing is to get educated — especially if you’re not a sex worker — about how sex workers will be uniquely impacted.

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PONGO POETRY: I Just Thought You Should Know

Pongo Poetry Project’s mission is to engage youth in writing poetry to inspire healing and growth. For over 20 years, Pongo has mentored poetry with youth at the Children & Family Justice Center (CFJC), King County’s juvenile detention facility. Many CFJC residents are Youth of Color who have endured traumatic experiences in the form of abuse, neglect, and exposure to violence. These incidents have been caused and exacerbated by community disinvestment, systemic racism, and other forms of institutional oppression. In collaboration with CFJC staff, Pongo poetry writing offers CFJC youth a vehicle for self-discovery and creative expression that inspires recovery and healing. Through this special bimonthly column in partnership with the South Seattle Emerald, Pongo invites readers to bear witness to the pain, resilience, and creative capacity of youth whose voices and perspectives are too often relegated to the periphery. To partner with Pongo in inspiring healing and relief in youth coping with mental and emotional turmoil, register for Speaking Volumes 2022, their fall celebration.


I Don’t Know

by a young person, age 16

I don’t know how I want to be today
I don’t know how to read a poem
I could write a poem about a lot of things
But I need to learn
Presentation skills

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OPINION: We Can Keep Our Schools and Communities Safe From Gun Violence

by Brad Blackburn III


I remember being in elementary school, huddled in the corner of a dark classroom as my teacher locked the door and instructed us to be silent. As I observed my peers, I noticed an array of behaviors in response to practicing the most terrifying scenario we could have imagined. Some stricken with anxiety, others silently crying with their heads in their laps, and others with smiles on their faces, chuckling ever so quietly as we conducted the active shooter drill. 

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PHOTO ESSAY: Community Fuels Urban Farm’s Equitable Food System Plans

by Sidney Aspinall and Azeb Tuji


Since 2017, the Rainier Beach Urban Farm and Wetlands (RBUFW) has been jointly operated by the Tilth Alliance and the Friends of Rainier Beach Urban Farm and Wetlands. 

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Weekend Reads: 50 Years of Title IX

by Kevin Schofield


This week marks the 50th anniversary of Title IX, which was signed into law by President Richard Nixon on June 23, 1972. The landmark legislation is comprised of a single sentence:

“No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance.”

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Local Reactions and Protests in Response to Supreme Court Decision to Overturn Roe v. Wade

by Phil Manzano


The U.S. Supreme Court formally overturned Roe v. Wade on the morning of Friday, June 24. The South Seattle Emerald has rounded up a variety of reactions, stories, and developing protests about the decision, starting with the lead story from Politico, which published a leaked draft of the ruling in May.

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Taking B(l)ack Pride Celebrates Queer and Trans BIPOC With SEACHELLA

by Patheresa Wells


Taking B(l)ack Pride (TBP) is Seattle’s only large-scale Pride event that centers on queer, trans, Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (QTBIPOC) communities. But TBP is more than just a Pride happening. It is lives. Lives that come together to celebrate, protect, and center their experiences. I spoke with members of TBP in advance of their third celebration, SEACHELLA, on June 25, 2022, at Seattle Center’s Mural Amphitheatre. SEACHELLA will be bigger than ever, featuring QTBIPOC performers from across the nation, food trucks and vendors, community resources, and family-friendly events.

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Amplifying the Authentic Narratives of South Seattle