Prideful Reflections: Steers and Queers

by Rollie Williams

Author’s note: This essay was originally composed in the summer of 2016. The world has obviously changed since then. As such,  I acknowledge my references to it getting better may not resonate as clearly as they once did with many readers. However, due to that fact I felt it was even more necessary for people to hear a positive story, which is why the piece is presented as first written.

My name is Rollie and I’m a bisexual man in my late twenties. It’s taken me a long time to say that with any confidence at all. If you’re wondering how long, I’ll give you a hint: It’s somewhere in the late twenties. In today’s world, living in Seattle, you might wonder what the hell took so long. Was he conservative? What was he afraid of? Did he experiment in college and adopt a new identity to match? The reality is frustratingly stereotypical and indicative of the power the patriarchy has over all of us. It has a happy ending though, I promise. Continue reading Prideful Reflections: Steers and Queers

The NAACP’s Concrete Plan to Close Intolerable Opportunity Gaps

By the NAACP Ethnic Studies Committee: Tracy Gill, Rita Green, Jon Greenberg, and Tess Williams 

Quick quiz. How many of these historical figures can you identify? Bayard Rustin, Benedict Arnold, Sylvia Rae Rivera, Larry Dulay Itliong, Robert E. Lee, Cecile Hansen, Queen Liliuokalani, Fred Toyosaburo Korematsu, Audre Lorde, Lucy Gonzales Parsons. Continue reading The NAACP’s Concrete Plan to Close Intolerable Opportunity Gaps

With Aspirations of Healing Community Divides, Youth Advocate Carries Forward with Peace Festival

by Marcus Harrison Green

Cortez Charles awoke Monday morning with a pain-soaked heart and a mind rumbling with confusion.

Like many in Seattle’s black community, the father of 4 was left reeling from the news that Charleena Lyles, 30-year-old pregnant mother of 3, was fatally shot by police officers in her Seattle apartment the previous day.

Awash in anguish and community outrage over the killing, Charles was struck by a dilemma. Continue reading With Aspirations of Healing Community Divides, Youth Advocate Carries Forward with Peace Festival

Station’s Block Party Soars in Raucous Community Celebration

by Alex Gallo-Brown

Last Saturday, thousands of people poured onto 16th Avenue north of South Lander Street in a gorgeous demonstration of solidarity, community expression, and love. The Beacon Hill Block Party at The Station coffee shop has been an annual occasion for years—“[It used to be] just four or five of us partying and trying to sell our wares,” Rob Castro, an artist and one of the original organizers, told me with a devious grin—but the event on Saturday was special even for Block Party veterans. Continue reading Station’s Block Party Soars in Raucous Community Celebration

Seniors, Teens Band Together For “Black Quilts Matter” Project

by Marcus Harrison Green

Over the span of 4 months, South End seniors and teens attempted to demolish the myth that collaboration between elders and youth was nigh impossible.  

Last Thursday, Rainier Beach High Schoolers – members of a generation so often maligned for possessing the attention span of a lightning strike – joined members of the Southeast Senior Service Center Happy Hands Quilters and Pacific Northwest African American Quilters in presenting two collaborative Black Lives Matter quilts to the South Seattle community. Continue reading Seniors, Teens Band Together For “Black Quilts Matter” Project

‘Murder is Murder’: Despite Reforms, Mourners Fear Justice Will Be Elusive for Charleena Lyles

by Sara Bernard

(This article was originally published by the Seattle Weekly and has been reprinted with permission)

A fierce grief blanketed the crowd of hundreds who rallied Tuesday evening outside the Sand Point home of Charleena Lyles, two days after the pregnant mother of four was shot and killed by two Seattle police officers. Many family members sobbed as they described the sister, the cousin, or the neice they’d lost, their voices catching in their throats; several family members tried to speak, but wept for a minute or two before they could manage get any words out at all. When James Bible, the civil rights attorney representing the family, described what happened on Sunday, Lyles’ older sister, Monika Williams, dashed through the crowd, sobbing, “I can’t hear this anymore. I can’t hear this anymore.” Continue reading ‘Murder is Murder’: Despite Reforms, Mourners Fear Justice Will Be Elusive for Charleena Lyles

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