Rainier and Othello festivals combine for celebration of community and culture

By Carolyn Bick

Hoisting her daughter Dayaa up onto her hip, Dana Gibson smiled as she looked around at the festivities in Othello Park.

“It’s our first time here in the park, but we usually frequent the festivities in Columbia City,” Gibson said, referring to the Rainier Valley Heritage Celebration that has taken place in Columbia City in the past. “There is a lot of community going on, so we like to support the locals.”

Continue reading Rainier and Othello festivals combine for celebration of community and culture

Punishing Shelter Providers Won’t Solve Seattle’s Homelessness Crisis

by Kayla Blau

There have been rumblings that the City of Seattle may fine local shelters that don’t move enough clients into permanent housing. When it comes to homelessness in Seattle (which has one of the most expensive rents in the nation), our city leadership must have better solutions than charging struggling nonprofits that are working diligently to house clients in a city with no available affordable housing.

Continue reading Punishing Shelter Providers Won’t Solve Seattle’s Homelessness Crisis

The Boot Writers Deliver Powerful Poems, Prose at Youngstown Arts Center

by Beverly Aarons

What happens when you give a group of youth a microphone and a spotlight? A powerful night of poems, prose, and passionate expressions of hope, pain, loss, and love. On August 9th, Southwest Youth & Family Services hosted a night of poetry and storytelling presented by more than a dozen youth participants of the Young Writers Workshop (aka The Boot). But age did not constrain the creativity expressed by these youths. Their poems and stories covered almost every topic—police brutality, body image, suicide, loneliness, sports, there was even a ventriloquist type performance about a drug deal trap set by law enforcement. And the crowd loved it. The theatre at the Youngstown Cultural Arts Center was packed with people—moms, dads, cousins, neighbors, friends, teachers, and random people from the community who have been coming to see The Boot youth writers express themselves for years. It was standing room only, even the stairs and aisles where used as seating.

Continue reading The Boot Writers Deliver Powerful Poems, Prose at Youngstown Arts Center

The nu Trio Pursues The Unknown

by Gus Marshall

The nu Trio displayed a vibrant performance to an engaged Royal Room audience August 4th. The nu Trio is an avant-garde jazz outfit that plays sincere cerebral jazz with an abundance of spirit. Consisting of Nathan Breedlove, Phil Sparks, and Brian Kirk, together they balance impeccable taste and talent in an effort to pursue the vast sonic unknown.

Continue reading The nu Trio Pursues The Unknown

Photo Essay: People Stay Cool in the 90-Degree Heat

by Susan Fried

After one of the hottest months of July on record in Seattle, August was supposed to be a little cooler. But the first 10 days remained oppressively hot, forcing Seattlites to seek out ways to escape the heat. Fortunately Seattle is surrounded by water and people in the South End found lots of places to access Lake Washington or a local park with a water feature.

Continue reading Photo Essay: People Stay Cool in the 90-Degree Heat

What Happens When Development Costs Trickle Down?

Residents of the South End are still grappling with the fallout of new development — and no one is taking responsibility

by Tammy Morales

As he flipped the ignition on his lawnmower, Ty Kocher knew that he would likely be disturbing Gerald. Gerald had been living in a tent tucked under a tree on Ty’s property for a few weeks, with permission from both Ty and Rainier Beach Action Coalition (RBAC), the neighborhood organization that was renting Ty’s house for office space.

Continue reading What Happens When Development Costs Trickle Down?

The Primary Election Results: Progressives Surging, But Still Have Work to Do

by Geov Parrish

Primaries in even-numbered years with no presidential or governor’s elections and no local elections other than the Washington  Legislature traditionally have the lowest turnout of any of the state’s primary election days. In 2014, the last such year, fewer  than 30 percent of eligible King County voters actually voted—about 351,000 of 1.175 million.

Continue reading The Primary Election Results: Progressives Surging, But Still Have Work to Do

Reportage, Culture & Commentary From The Most Eclectic Place on Earth