With Aspirations of Healing Community Divides, Youth Advocate Carries Forward with Peace Festival

by Marcus Harrison Green

Cortez Charles awoke Monday morning with a pain-soaked heart and a mind rumbling with confusion.

Like many in Seattle’s black community, the father of 4 was left reeling from the news that Charleena Lyles, 30-year-old pregnant mother of 3, was fatally shot by police officers in her Seattle apartment the previous day.

Awash in anguish and community outrage over the killing, Charles was struck by a dilemma. Continue reading With Aspirations of Healing Community Divides, Youth Advocate Carries Forward with Peace Festival

Station’s Block Party Soars in Raucous Community Celebration

by Alex Gallo-Brown

Last Saturday, thousands of people poured onto 16th Avenue north of South Lander Street in a gorgeous demonstration of solidarity, community expression, and love. The Beacon Hill Block Party at The Station coffee shop has been an annual occasion for years—“[It used to be] just four or five of us partying and trying to sell our wares,” Rob Castro, an artist and one of the original organizers, told me with a devious grin—but the event on Saturday was special even for Block Party veterans. Continue reading Station’s Block Party Soars in Raucous Community Celebration

Seniors, Teens Band Together For “Black Quilts Matter” Project

by Marcus Harrison Green

Over the span of 4 months, South End seniors and teens attempted to demolish the myth that collaboration between elders and youth was nigh impossible.  

Last Thursday, Rainier Beach High Schoolers – members of a generation so often maligned for possessing the attention span of a lightning strike – joined members of the Southeast Senior Service Center Happy Hands Quilters and Pacific Northwest African American Quilters in presenting two collaborative Black Lives Matter quilts to the South Seattle community. Continue reading Seniors, Teens Band Together For “Black Quilts Matter” Project

‘Murder is Murder’: Despite Reforms, Mourners Fear Justice Will Be Elusive for Charleena Lyles

by Sara Bernard

(This article was originally published by the Seattle Weekly and has been reprinted with permission)

A fierce grief blanketed the crowd of hundreds who rallied Tuesday evening outside the Sand Point home of Charleena Lyles, two days after the pregnant mother of four was shot and killed by two Seattle police officers. Many family members sobbed as they described the sister, the cousin, or the neice they’d lost, their voices catching in their throats; several family members tried to speak, but wept for a minute or two before they could manage get any words out at all. When James Bible, the civil rights attorney representing the family, described what happened on Sunday, Lyles’ older sister, Monika Williams, dashed through the crowd, sobbing, “I can’t hear this anymore. I can’t hear this anymore.” Continue reading ‘Murder is Murder’: Despite Reforms, Mourners Fear Justice Will Be Elusive for Charleena Lyles

Don’t Let Stigma Win: You Can and Should Talk about Mental Illness

by Lyndsey Brollini

Stigma around mental illness is real and affects individuals in negative ways, often leading them to remain silent about their condition rather than seek help or treatment. It is important to talk about these issues get all the relevant facts because forgoing assistance can have detrimental consequences, to the point of suicide for some. Continue reading Don’t Let Stigma Win: You Can and Should Talk about Mental Illness

How Can I Get a Place to Rent on Themyscira?

by Gracie Bucklew

[Note: This column contains spoilers for the movie Wonder Woman]

I guess they’re right — women really are hyper-emotional.

At least I was, along with many other women, while watching Wonder Woman at Ark Lodge Cinemas last week. Watching muscular women jump and fight and engage in brutal combat with each other may seem odd to cry over, but trust me, I was close. I wasn’t sad, don’t get me wrong, I was simply experiencing something amazing. Continue reading How Can I Get a Place to Rent on Themyscira?

African American Male Advisory Committee Unveils Preliminary Recommendations to Ensure Students Graduate “Seattle Ready”

by Melia LaCour

“Imagine this: our African American males graduate “Seattle Ready;” they are competitive in their [chosen] field; they’re self-actualized; they know who they are; they’re civic minded and full-fledged citizens of Seattle. Can you see that?”

This question, posed by Brent Jones, Seattle Public Schools’ Chief of Strategies and Partnerships, invited participants at last Thursday’s African American Advisory Committee (AAMAC) Community Forum at Nova High School to embrace a vision for black male scholars that has been long overdue: an assured, clear pathway to thriving success. Continue reading African American Male Advisory Committee Unveils Preliminary Recommendations to Ensure Students Graduate “Seattle Ready”