Tag Archives: Featured

Intentionalist: Find Us at These BIPOC-Owned Food Trucks

by Jax Kiel

Intentionalist is built on one simple idea: where we spend our money matters. We make it easy to find, learn about, and support small businesses and the diverse people behind them through everyday decisions about where we eat, drink, and shop. #SpendLikeItMatters


Since the late 2000s, food trucks have become increasingly popular across the United States. Mobile food purveyors have created a street food-esque alternative to fast food for the customers looking to walk up, grab their food, and go. 

For some truck owners, their way of doing business is the affordable alternative to opening a brick-and-mortar. For others, their food truck is a way of sharing their passion with the widest, most diverse population they can. 

While there is a plethora of food trucks in the heart of downtown Seattle, don’t forget about the incredible businesses selling food in South Seattle. For those not looking to venture deep into the city, visit one of the food trucks on your doorstep.

You can find these three BIPOC-owned food trucks in and around the Central District and South Seattle, serving fast, easy, and delicious dishes. Keep an eye out on their websites and social media to find out when they’ll be near you next.

Continue reading Intentionalist: Find Us at These BIPOC-Owned Food Trucks

Weekend Long Reads: How to Save a Quarter-Trillion Dollars in Our Healthcare System

by Kevin Schofield


Each year nearly $4 trillion is spent on health care in the United States; of that, about one-quarter, or $950 million, is spent on administrative expenses. This week’s “long read” is a report by the business consultant McKinsey & Company on how money could be saved through administrative simplification and other business process improvements.

American health care is a multi-payer (over 900 of them), largely for-profit system. The benefit of such a system is that it can drive innovation in technology and treatments, as we have seen during the COVID-19 pandemic with vaccines to reduce infections and new drugs to treat the disease. But as we all know only too well, it is a broken system in many aspects: It’s expensive, often inefficient, and far less than comprehensive. Many of the policy decisions that brought us to this point are beyond the scope of McKinsey’s study, but it doesn’t take much work to identify the inefficiency and expense derived from the overhead of having multiple payers, providers, and patients. The health care industry is also heavily regulated, which protects patients but creates additional overhead for compliance.

Continue reading Weekend Long Reads: How to Save a Quarter-Trillion Dollars in Our Healthcare System

Skyway Community Members Offered Stipend to Participate in Building Local Food Economy

by Elizabeth Turnbull


Community members are encouraged to join and provide input at “Local Foods, Local Places Virtual Workshop” sessions which will be held Monday through Thursday of next week. Organized by the Urban Food Systems Pact – Skyway (UFSPS), the events will help develop a community action plan to grow the local food economy and to improve access to healthy foods.

The sessions will explore possible food-related projects such as developing an affordable neighborhood farmer’s market, a food hub with a commercial kitchen for entrepreneurs, or a gardening program led by BIPOC elders. 

The purpose of the workshop is to form a short-term action plan for improving access to local foods to be implemented through the next two to five years.

Continue reading Skyway Community Members Offered Stipend to Participate in Building Local Food Economy

Libraries, Artists, and Community Members Host ‘What the World Needs Now: A Dreamathon’

by Chamidae Ford


In response to the COVID-19 delta variant, The Seattle Public Library (SPL) has teamed up with an array of entertainers, community organizations, and artists to create “What the World Needs Now: A Dreamathon.” The Dreamathon is a series dedicated to encouraging community members to imagine a better pandemic life through art, music, and knowledge. 

“We started COVID response projects in 2020 but intentionally decided that community-led work should be at the center of what we were doing,” SPL public engagements program manager Davida Ingram said. “So there’s a really beautiful array of culturally specific work that happened in response to COVID that has a lot of implications for racial justice and the role that arts and culture sort of plays in amplifying concerns around public health.”

Continue reading Libraries, Artists, and Community Members Host ‘What the World Needs Now: A Dreamathon’

Law Students Demand Seattle University Cut Ties With Data Companies Working With ICE

by Bunthay Cheam


Seattle University Law School students are calling on their school to cut ties with data companies Thomson Reuters and RELX PLC, the parent companies of legal research tools Westlaw and LexisNexis, respectively, because of their relationship with Immigration Customs Enforcement (ICE).

On Oct. 4, 2021, the law students who are part of the national group, End the Contract Coalition (ECC), took part in a week of action that included a virtual panel facilitated by Mijente, a Latinx and Chicanx political activism group, and on campus direct action. Students unfurled a massive sign to inform students and faculty of their campaign and laid out sleeping bags covered in foil blankets inside the Law School building to represent people in custody at immigration holding facilities. 

In April, Seattle University Law School students Sam Sueoka and Peyton Jacobsen discovered the relationship between LexisNexis and ICE through an Intercept article.

According to the ECC website: “LexisNexis signed a $16.8 million contract with ICE, further consolidating the relationship between legal research companies and law enforcement agencies. The contract states that LexisNexis will provide Homeland Security investigators with access to billions of records containing personal data from an array of public and private sources, including credit history, bankruptcy records, license plate images, and cellular subscriber information. Both Thomson Reuters and RELX have a history of supplying ICE with person-specific data which allows the agency to conduct rapid searches for personal information.”

Continue reading Law Students Demand Seattle University Cut Ties With Data Companies Working With ICE

What the South End Wants to Hear from Seattle City Candidates

by Agueda Pacheco Flores


Even though Danielle Jackson says she is skeptical of the system, she always votes.

“I want my vote to count, but I’m not always happy with the people in place,” she says. 

Jackson is a long-time Rainier Valley resident and founder of the Changing Habits and Motivating Personal Self-Esteem (CHAMPS) organization. Her community organization helps connect Rainier Valley residents with programs and resources such as violence prevention workshops taught by youth for youth. The non-profit partners with groups, businesses, and churches across the valley to help people who may be struggling. 

Continue reading What the South End Wants to Hear from Seattle City Candidates

PHOTO ESSAY: Rediscovering the Central District With Wa Na Wari’s ‘Walk the Block’

by Susan Fried


Over seven hundred people bought tickets for Wa Na Wari’s inaugural “Walk the Block fundraising event on Saturday, Oct. 16. Attendees were treated to a feast of visual art, music, dance, food, and drinks. 

Upon arriving at the event, participants were given maps, chose custom racing bibs with a variety of words and slogans, and then set off on a .08 mile walk through the Central District neighborhood. During “Walk the Block,” they could find work by artists Inye Wokoma, Chloe King, and Kimisha Turner. There were also video pieces by Martine Syms, Sable Elyse Smith, and the Shelf Life Community Story Project, as well as live music by the Gary Hammon Band. Three blocks away, in front of the Garfield Community Center, there were dance performances by Northwest Tap Connection and the Bring Us Collective, with jazz trumpeter Owuor Arunga playing in between performances. There were 15 stops along the way.

Elisheba Johnson, co-founder of Wa Na Wari, told the Emerald that the event was “a total success.” 

Continue reading PHOTO ESSAY: Rediscovering the Central District With Wa Na Wari’s ‘Walk the Block’

NEWS GLEAMS: The Great Debate, SAAF-T Free Workshop, NewHolly Branch Reopens, & More!

curated by Emerald Staff

A round-up of news and announcements we don’t want to get lost in the fast-churning news cycle!


The Great Debate 2021

On the afternoon of Saturday, Oct. 23, attend The Great Debate at the Rainier Arts Center, 3515 S. Alaska St., to hear from candidates for Seattle Mayor, City Council Position 9, City Attorney, and King County Executive.

Moderated by Marcus Green, Mike Davis, and Lance Randall, the schedule is as follows:

  • King County Executive — 12–1 p.m., Dow Constantine • Joe Nguyen 
  • Seattle City Attorney — 1:15–2:15 p.m., Ann Davison • Nicole Thomas-Kennedy
  • Seattle Council Position 9 — 2:30–3:30 p.m., Sara Nelson • Nikkita Oliver
  • Seattle Mayor — 3:45–4:45 p.m., Bruce Harrell • Lorena Gonzalez

If you’re interested in attending The Great Debate in person, go to Rainier Arts Center’s Eventbrite page to register. 

COVID-19 protocols for masks and temperature checks will be followed. Attendees will be required to show proof of vaccination or a negative PCR COVID-19 test in the last 48 hours before entering the Rainier Arts Center.

The South Seattle Emerald is an event partner for The Great Debate .

Continue reading NEWS GLEAMS: The Great Debate, SAAF-T Free Workshop, NewHolly Branch Reopens, & More!

Unemployment Data Shows Unequal Recovery, Galvanizes South End Equity Efforts

by Alexa Peters


Recovery in south King County has not kept up with north King County and preexisting economic disparities between the two regions were exacerbated by the pandemic, a recent Economic Security Department (ESD) report said.

The August ESD report showed evidence of an ongoing economic recovery in King County, including an unemployment rate much lower than in other counties at 4.8%, suggesting that King County’s recovery has been the swiftest in the state. That said, data at the city level shows a different picture.

In January 2020, the highest unemployment rate among Auburn, Kirkland, Redmond, and Renton was 3.4% in Auburn, and the lowest was 2.1% in Redmond.

“While the relative positions of these four communities persisted throughout the pandemic, the gap over time has widened,” said Anneliese Vance-Sherman, regional labor economist for the ESD. “All four communities are worse off today than they were before the pandemic, but it is taking longer for the South End communities to recover.”

Continue reading Unemployment Data Shows Unequal Recovery, Galvanizes South End Equity Efforts