Tag Archives: Featured

‘Silent March’ in Tacoma Commemorates Manuel Ellis Ahead of Anniversary of His Death

by Will James

(This article originally appeared at KNKX and has been reprinted under an agreement.)


Days before the anniversary of Manuel Ellis’ death, about 200 people marched a mile through Tacoma, quiet except for the beating of a drum.

The “silent march” on Sunday, Feb. 28, was organized by Black religious leaders in Tacoma to commemorate Ellis, who was killed by Tacoma police on March 3, 2020.

Continue reading ‘Silent March’ in Tacoma Commemorates Manuel Ellis Ahead of Anniversary of His Death

The Morning Update Show — 3/1/21

The Morning Update Show — hosted by Trae Holiday and The Big O (Omari Salisbury) — is the only weekday news and information livestream that delivers culturally relevant content to the Pacific Northwest’s urban audience. Omari and Trae analyze the day’s local and national headlines as well as melanin magic in our community. Watch live every weekday at 11 a.m. on any of the following channels, hosted by Converge Media: YouTube, Twitch, Facebook, Periscope, and whereweconverge.com.

We also post the Morning Update Show here on the Emerald each day after it airs, so you can catch up any time of day while you peruse our latest posts.

Continue reading The Morning Update Show — 3/1/21

South King County Residents 65 and Older Eligible for Vaccination at Mass Vaccination Sites

by Carolyn Bick


South King County residents aged 65 and older are now eligible to be vaccinated at Public Health — Seattle & King County’s two South King County mass vaccination sites starting today, March 1.

Continue reading South King County Residents 65 and Older Eligible for Vaccination at Mass Vaccination Sites

Rad Pacific Northwest Women and Femmes, Part 1

by Larissa McCartney


In 2020, I attempted to participate in the Instagram #100Days challenge where artists and creatives pick one theme and medium to practice for 100 days. My goal was to digitally illustrate 100 badass women and femmes of the Pacific Northwest, from all walks of life and different professions, who inspired me for a number of different reasons. I didn’t quite make it to 100, but in the end that didn’t matter! Nominations from friends, co-workers, and people on Instagram helped curate a long list of incredible individuals who contribute to and represent the PNW, influencing this great place we call home. Below are a selection of a few of these phenomenal local people along with my illustrations.

Continue reading Rad Pacific Northwest Women and Femmes, Part 1

Vaccine Inequality and Structural Racist Optics

by Oscar Rosales Castaneda


In early February, The Seattle Times published a report that provides a preliminary glimpse at who has had access to the first set of COVID vaccines that were doled out. As much as I want to tell myself that this is an incomplete picture and that the first set of vaccines is reflective of a strategy to inoculate first responders and medical personnel, I still feel that the preliminary rollout failed to address a key consideration. Namely, the disproportionate impact that the pandemic has had on people of color and economically marginalized folks.

Continue reading Vaccine Inequality and Structural Racist Optics

Black History Today: Roxanne Christian-Dancer — a Brilliant Reminder of What’s Possible

by Marcus Harden


(Black History Today is published in collaboration with Rise Up for Students.)

“Mama exhorted her children at every opportunity to ‘Jump at de sun.’ We might not land on the sun, but at least we would get off the ground.” — Zora Neale Hurston (Dust Tracks on a Road, 1942) 

I’ve heard it said that we aren’t humans on a spiritual journey, but we are spirits having a human experience. In life you encounter people who seem like they’ve “been here before” because of their vast knowledge and understanding of the world — who are well traveled in the physical, mental and spiritual spaces.

Roxanne Christian-Dancer is one of those people who has been here before. Born in Columbus, Georgia, and raised by her angelic and equally ambitious mother, Ms. Rolaina, who embedded the spirit of discovery in her, Roxanne is truly a renaissance woman. Her latter formative years were spent in Seattle, where she graduated from Ingraham High School and later the University of Washington.

Continue reading Black History Today: Roxanne Christian-Dancer — a Brilliant Reminder of What’s Possible

OPINION: Clean Air Everywhere, for Everyone in Washington

by Paulina López and Troy D. Abel  


Recently, legislative debates turned from carbon pricing to the Healthy Environment for All Act (HEAL) uplifting environmental justice (EJ). This is important legislation, but what we really need are bold solutions and different laws addressing a persistent form of unjust and ongoing pollution. Air toxic exposure disparities and their impacts on communities like the Duwamish Valley are still being ignored by politicians and industry. This inattention continues even as new research suggests that higher air pollution may increase COVID-19 vulnerability and deaths.

Many environmentalists in our region not only overlook decades of toxic air pollution injustice, some even gloss over the problem. In January, the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Seattle office announced that industrial toxic releases declined in the Northwest. Pollution dropped 12% in 2019 for 752 facilities in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and Alaska. They further asserted “that U.S. companies that use and manage chemicals and metals continue to make progress in preventing pollution.” 

But we knew that regional averages likely obscured trends in our heavily polluted Duwamish River Valley neighborhoods of Georgetown and South Park — often first documented by our community. EPA analysts lumped air, water, and land pollution together. When viewed separately, air and water pollution went up in the Northwest. Surface-water discharges increased by 1.17 million pounds and air pollution by 610 thousand pounds between 2018 and 2019. 

Continue reading OPINION: Clean Air Everywhere, for Everyone in Washington

Virtual Groundbreaking of Uncle Bob’s Place Honors Legendary Community Activist

by Ronnie Estoque


The love that the Seattle community had for legendary civil-rights activist Robert “Uncle Bob” Santos was in full bloom Thursday evening for the virtual groundbreaking of a new affordable housing development named after him. An additional Zoom overflow room had to be created to accommodate all the many community members in attendance. The CID-based InterIm Community Development Association (CDA) in charge of the development produced a video shown during the event that discussed Uncle Bob’s contributions to the neighborhood and details about the building, which is set to begin its construction in the second week of March.

Continue reading Virtual Groundbreaking of Uncle Bob’s Place Honors Legendary Community Activist

POETRY: Revolutionary Encounters

by Evelyn Chow


Free Write: “If the revolution will not be televised, where will it be seen?” (thank you Nikkita for the prompt) 

You will not find the revolution posted in the window of the fancy new coffee shop down the block 

Or at the ginger beer store run by the white lady with dreadlocks 

The revolution will not have private security or no-trespassing signs 

You will not simply put a #BlackLivesMatter banner in your driveway, window, or storefront because 

The revolution will not be gentrified 

Continue reading POETRY: Revolutionary Encounters