Tag Archives: Featured

Neighbors Unite to Bring Spring Flowers Into Their Homes—and Save a Local Business

by Andrew Engelson


Sheltering in place at her home during the coronavirus pandemic, Callista Chen was scanning the internet for ways to help struggling businesses in the International District.

That’s when she stumbled on the tulips.

Chen, who lives on Beacon Hill, had been regularly visiting the Facebook group Support the ID, seeking out tasty restaurants for takeout orders, and finding other ways to support the beleaguered neighborhood during the COVID-19 outbreak. Not long ago, Chen noticed a post from a flower grower named Nikki Cha, whose family-owned flower-growing business, Blong’s Garden, was in trouble. After Gov. Jay Inslee’s stay-at-home order, their stand at Pike Place Market had virtually no customers, and the closure of farmers’ markets across the city had devastated their sales. Continue reading Neighbors Unite to Bring Spring Flowers Into Their Homes—and Save a Local Business

Artists’ Coalition Creates Safety Net for Creatives Affected by COVID-19

by Kamna Shastri


Matthew Lang, a parkour, acrobatics, dance, and theater artist, went from teaching 13 classes a week to just one, via streaming services, all in the blink of a week. In less than a month, Lang suddenly found himself worried about being able to afford rent, with his business failing.

Ash Leon, a rapper and hip-hop artist who recently moved to Seattle from New York, has a new single that just released, and an EP scheduled to drop in April. Leon had performances and promotional events lined up, but now — “all I can do is hope that people will stream my music enough that I will be able to receive a significant royalty check,” Leon said.

Continue reading Artists’ Coalition Creates Safety Net for Creatives Affected by COVID-19

For domestic abuse survivors, staying home has its own dangers

by Carolyn Bick

Author’s Note: If you are in crisis or need help, scroll down to find a list of helplines and resources at the end of this story.

Years ago, Ariel Gliboff fled her abuser by getting on a plane, and flying far away. It was hard enough then, she said. But now, with a stay-home order in place for Washington State?

“Honestly, this situation we are currently in is worst-case,” said Gliboff, the Redmond-based host of The Domestic Violence Discussion podcast. “I hopped on a plane, and I left the state, and that was how I escaped. And if I were looking to that these days, with the restrictions on flying and even public transportation –– even on buses –– that would just limit my options on how I would leave.” 

Continue reading For domestic abuse survivors, staying home has its own dangers

Essential Business Owners Show Resilience in the Central District

by Gavin Amos


D’vonne Pickett Jr., the owner of The Postman, is standing outside his shop on the corner of Martin Luther King Jr. and Union, talking to me about his vision for his business. D’vonne co-owns the micro mail service with his wife, Keana Pickett. They have dreams of expansion, but those are being put on standby because of the COVID-19 outbreak. They’re still able to stay open now as their shop is considered an essential business. On the front lines keeping together America’s fragile economic and service system, D’vonne stands strong, amidst the danger he and his team are bearing together. He begins to talk to me about what life and business has been like since the state has shut down, and he talks with unrelenting positivity.

Continue reading Essential Business Owners Show Resilience in the Central District

Inslee considers extending stay-home order, addresses violation reporting, equipment shortages

by Carolyn Bick

Though the rate of novel coronavirus infections has slowed, Washington State Gov. Jay Inslee said that Washingtonians still aren’t staying home enough.

At a televised press conference on March 30, Inslee said that the data that has come in over the weekend has been “alarming.” The number of positive tests that have been coming in from counties surrounding King County, such as Skagit County, Adams County, and Island County have been two to three times higher than the week or so before. 

Inslee attributes this to people going out too often on non-essential trips, thereby not following his stay-home order as well they should.

Continue reading Inslee considers extending stay-home order, addresses violation reporting, equipment shortages

Seattle Artists Offer Hope and Inspiration During COVID-19, Even as They Struggle Themselves

by Sharon H. Chang


It has been said that life depends on science, but the arts make it worth living. So what role do artists play during a pandemic? A really big one. There is ample research showing the many benefits of the arts: improved mood, increased cognitive function, even boosted immunity. From streaming performances to online workshops and movement classes, Seattle artists are helping people find hope and inspiration during the COVID-19 outbreak even as they struggle themselves. Continue reading Seattle Artists Offer Hope and Inspiration During COVID-19, Even as They Struggle Themselves

South Seattle Neighborcare Response to COVID-19 Exposes Health Care Inequities

by Alexa Peters


In South Seattle, those who are uninsured, face housing instability, or are undocumented immigrants have few places to turn other than sliding-scale neighborhood clinics like Neighborcare. With South End locations in Columbia City, Rainier Beach, and Georgetown, Neighborcare typically provides vital medical, dental and behavioral care to South King County residents as well as those who have been pushed out by gentrification and come to the clinic from as far away as Kent and Tukwila. Continue reading South Seattle Neighborcare Response to COVID-19 Exposes Health Care Inequities

Students on the autism spectrum and their parents face extra hurdles in trying to learn from home

by Carolyn Bick

Less than a week after Seattle Public Schools closed its schools’ doors to help stop the spread of the novel coronavirus, working single mom Karen Anthony found her seven-year-old son James on the roof of the house.

“He’s climbed up on my roof twice now. And this happens in five minutes –– quite miraculous, actually,” Anthony said with a small laugh.

Anthony’s two children, James and his brother Elliott, 13, both attend Seattle Public Schools (SPS) and are severely impacted by autism spectrum disorder. They were each diagnosed at age two-and-a-half. When school is in session, the boys require high levels of support in the classroom.

Continue reading Students on the autism spectrum and their parents face extra hurdles in trying to learn from home

A COVID-19 Living Guide for South Seattle

by Emerald Staff


The Emerald’s Coverage, All in One Place

News about the COVID-19 (aka coronavirus) pandemic breaks at a dizzying pace. Countless updates, recommendations, and stories flood inboxes and saturate headlines and social media feeds. With myriad sources relaying the latest happenings, the pandemic is a whirlwind event for folx to keep up with — while simultaneously staying healthy.

Continue reading A COVID-19 Living Guide for South Seattle