Tag Archives: Featured

King County Equity Now and Decriminalize Seattle Coalitions Direct New Demand to Durkan

by Elizabeth Turnbull


On Friday the King County Equity Now and Decriminalize Seattle coalitions demanded that the funds from Mayor Durkan’s commitment to channel $100 million dollars of the city’s 2021 budget to BIPOC communities, go through a participatory budget process to ensure BIPOC communities control where this money goes. Continue reading King County Equity Now and Decriminalize Seattle Coalitions Direct New Demand to Durkan

City to Invest in 599 New Housing Units for Those Experiencing Chronic Homelessness

by Chetanya Robinson


In an effort to speed up the construction of housing for people experiencing homelessness during the COVID-19 pandemic, the City of Seattle is investing in 599 new permanent supportive housing units. Continue reading City to Invest in 599 New Housing Units for Those Experiencing Chronic Homelessness

Some Detained Protestors Must Wait at Least Six Months for Own Arrest Records, Hampering Legal Efforts

by Carolyn Bick


Seven days after Aisling Cooney filed a public records request with the Seattle Police Department (SPD) to get her own arrest records and associated materials from her arrest at the Capitol Hill protest on July 25, the records department succinctly informed her in an email that these records wouldn’t be available to her until late February 2021.

Cooney isn’t alone. At the advice of lawyers with Smith Law, at least four others who have also filed for their arrest records — as well as associated documents, recordings, and more — as part of several civil lawsuits they hope to bring against SPD have received similar messages: the SPD’s Legal Unit is “operating under an extreme backlog of requests, staffing shortages, the redeployment of supporting units to SPD’s frontline COVID-19 response, and, pursuant to CDC recommendations and City direction, reassignment to remote access.”

Continue reading Some Detained Protestors Must Wait at Least Six Months for Own Arrest Records, Hampering Legal Efforts

Terry J. Caver, The Black Man Killed By SPD Officers In May, As Remembered By His Family

by Paul Faruq Kiefer

(This article originally appeared on The C Is for Crank and has been reprinted under an agreement.)


Vanessa Caver learned of her brother’s killing several days after Seattle police officers shot Terry J. Caver near an intersection in Lower Queen Anne on May 19th. Her daughter called her unexpectedly to pass along the news. A few more days passed before she got a call from a sergeant from the Seattle Police Department called her to ask if she wanted to talk about her brother’s death. “I didn’t know what to talk about,” she explained when we spoke this week. “And the sergeant couldn’t tell me anything.” Continue reading Terry J. Caver, The Black Man Killed By SPD Officers In May, As Remembered By His Family

OPINION: How to Take Action on Black Women’s Equal Pay Day

“I have been paid less than a white female colleague, in a job where I was tasked with even more work. I had to learn to advocate for myself and address the issue with my supervisors head-on. Self-advocacy has become a mechanism of survival for so many Black women in the workforce, because American companies, nonprofits, and institutions systematically undervalue our work.”‘

by Hamdi Mohamed

(This article was originally published on The Fold and has been reprinted with permission)


America. The land of opportunity, the land where dreams come true—just not for so many who look like me.

According to statistics from Equal Pay Today, 80 percent of Black women are the sole or main breadwinner in their households. And yet, they are paid only $0.61 for every $1 a white non-Hispanic man is paid. Continue reading OPINION: How to Take Action on Black Women’s Equal Pay Day

Relief Fund for Undocumented Workers to Go Live in Autumn, Inslee Says

by Carolyn Bick


Though his office unveiled a $40 million fund for undocumented workers earlier this week, Washington State Gov. Jay Inslee said in a press conference on Aug. 13 that the one-time payment fund won’t be available for undocumented workers until the autumn. He also said that the state has made available another $3 million in CARES Act funding for certain food production workers who have to quarantine themselves, due to infection from the novel coronavirus.

Continue reading Relief Fund for Undocumented Workers to Go Live in Autumn, Inslee Says

Stay-at-Home, Read-at-Home with KCLS: Curbside to Go is Open!

by Maggie Block


At the beginning of Governor Jay Inslee’s stay-at-home orders to slow the spread of COVID-19, the King County Library System (KCLS) and the South Seattle Emerald teamed up to offer book recommendations to help readers get through the pandemic shutdown. While there may be more opportunities to get out and about now, many of us continue to spend more time at home, and could still use some great reading material to consume during the reopening process.

With that in mind, I am happy to inform you that KCLS is now offering Curbside to Go at select locations! You can place holds on KCLS’ physical materials, and pick them up outside one of our many participating libraries, including the Skyway Library for all you South Enders. Surprise bags of books are also available at Curbside to Go locations, which are filled with five books according to age and interest. Visit kcls.org/curbside to learn more about library locations, hours of operation, and how to schedule a pickup.

Continue reading Stay-at-Home, Read-at-Home with KCLS: Curbside to Go is Open!

OPINION: The Importance of Nuance in Confronting Racism

by George Griffin III


Carmen Best is a friend. Good people. Classy, strong. She deserved better. 

After everyone gets through scapegoating the Seattle City Council and Black Lives Matter (BLM) protests for her resignation, maybe we should take a good hard look at Seattle’s years of inactivity when People of Color and other people said the department needed some serious reform and restructuring. This lack of attention to the concerns of People of Color and allies contributed to the Seattle Police Department ultimately being placed under the current consent decree after an investigation by the U.S. Attorney’s Office in 2012. Do we need to be reminded how, when Best was interim chief in 2018, she was disrespected and passed over by the current mayor in the initial interview process and how she only got the job after communities of color and allies spoke up? Many prominent people were quiet at that time because they didn’t want to criticize their friend, the new mayor.

Continue reading OPINION: The Importance of Nuance in Confronting Racism

Here’s What’s Going On With the Mayoral Recall Election Fight — Without All the Legalese

by Carolyn Bick


In early June, Grace Harvey’s doctor ordered them to leave their house for several days. It wasn’t because their normal living conditions were unhealthy. It was because a significant amount of the tear gas Seattle Police Department (SPD) officers used against protestors on Capitol Hill had leaked into their house, and Harvey has pre-existing medical conditions.

“And it was like, ‘Okay, thank you for that input, but I can’t leave my house indefinitely,’” Harvey said with a laugh.

Still, Harvey did as they were asked and ended up staying elsewhere for two days. But they also decided enough was enough and started a Change.org petition to gauge the public’s interest in a recall election for current Seattle mayor, Jenny Durkan. That petition has since snowballed, and Harvey has become the Chair of the Recall Durkan campaign, whose name is as deceptively simple as its overall goal: to hold a recall election for Durkan. 

Continue reading Here’s What’s Going On With the Mayoral Recall Election Fight — Without All the Legalese

South Seattle Businesses Have a New Guide on the Road to Reopening

by Ben Adlin


As more South Seattle small businesses reopen amid the ongoing pandemic, a new program led by a local chamber of commerce wants to ensure that customers and employees feel as safe as possible.

The Seattle Southside Chamber of Commerce last week announced the launch of the “Southside Promise” campaign, an effort to equip local businesses with information and guidance to safely reopen. The program, a partnership with the City of Tukwila, provides face masks and other personal protective equipment and offers a reopening toolkit — essentially an in-depth slideshow presentation — aimed at helping businesses navigate the sometimes dizzying process of reopening.

Continue reading South Seattle Businesses Have a New Guide on the Road to Reopening