Category Archives: Arts & Culture

Baldwin’s Blues for Mister Charlie Pulses With Humanity and Heartbreak

by Carla Bell

James Baldwin was many things: a novelist, essayist, orator, a realist, a forerunner of intersectionality before it had a name, and a playwright. Perhaps his most well-known works are Notes of a Native Son, which “inaugurated Baldwin as one of the leading interpreters of the dramatic social changes erupting in the United States in the twentieth century” (Amazon), and The Fire Next Time, a compilation of two essays, A Letter To My Nephew and Down at the Cross. Continue reading Baldwin’s Blues for Mister Charlie Pulses With Humanity and Heartbreak

Brightening the Grey: Dozer’s Warehouse on Beacon Hill Creates Pop-Up Street Art & Muralist Gallery

words and photos by Alex Garland

Seattle is often called “The Emerald City” due to the ever-shrinking tree canopy that provides us with shade and clean air. Those that call it home, know Seattle by its true color: grey. From the concrete that makes up our buildings and sidewalks to the nine months of cloudy skies, this town can be a gloomy place. Continue reading Brightening the Grey: Dozer’s Warehouse on Beacon Hill Creates Pop-Up Street Art & Muralist Gallery

Expo Showcases Seattle’s Black Literary Scene

by Carla Bell

Warmth and amber sunlight poured in through the many open windows of historic Washington Hall last Saturday afternoon. There was buzz of conversation and shuffle of feet across the hardwoods in an atmosphere of honor and studious absorption, as authors and book lovers took part in the second Seattle Urban Book Expo (SUBE). Continue reading Expo Showcases Seattle’s Black Literary Scene

Fun. No Fun. Featuring Dawn Cerny: Walk. Use Your Library Voice. And Don’t Touch. But Enjoy Yourself.

by Brian Bergen-Aurand

Sundays are free admission to the Henry Art Gallery on the campus of the University of Washington, so we made it a family outing to see the new installation Fun. No Fun. by Kraft Duntz featuring Dawn Cerny. (It runs until 10 September.) I had read Travis Vogt’s interview with Cerny in City Arts, “The Comedic Architecture of Dawn Cerny,” (23 March 2017) and was intrigued by the concepts of “comedic architecture” and “the hidden corners of domestic life on a budget” as well as Cerny’s interview statements regarding houses and moms. Continue reading Fun. No Fun. Featuring Dawn Cerny: Walk. Use Your Library Voice. And Don’t Touch. But Enjoy Yourself.

Trombone Shorty Bringing Sound of New Orleans to Seattle

by Jake Uitti

Trombone Shorty, playing Seattle on Sunday, August 20 as part of the annual Woodland Park Zoo series, is well known for his prowess on brass instruments. Famous for his skills on the trumpet, trombone and as a bandleader, Trombone Shorty (aka New Orleans’ Troy Andrews) has been fronting groups since he was a child. An affable, thoughtful and generous fellow, the musician recently began a summer tour showcasing the music from his hometown, including cuts off his new record, 2017’s Parking Lot Symphony. We had a chance to catch up with the virtuoso to ask him about the Big Easy, how his musical ear developed, his thoughts on his lineage and much more. Continue reading Trombone Shorty Bringing Sound of New Orleans to Seattle

Urban Book Expo Founder Returning Swagger to Seattle’s Writing Scene

by Carla Bell

“We create worlds” – a commission and a solemn responsibility. Almost a decree.  From a young age, it’s this magic and power that drew him in.  

Jeff “Jay” Cheatham II, founder of the Seattle Urban Book Expo (SUBE), recalls stories of good vs. evil, villains and heroes, comic book dramas, and even televised wrestling as early influencers of his voice as a writer today.   Continue reading Urban Book Expo Founder Returning Swagger to Seattle’s Writing Scene