Category Archives: Arts & Culture

Everyday Black Exhibit Asks “Do You See Me Now?”

by Lola E. Peters

The first clue was the full parking lot at Northwest African American Museum (NAAM). The opening reception for the Everyday Black exhibit was scheduled to begin at 6:00pm, and it was 5:55pm. One of the few bonuses of being physically challenged is the parking placard that usually enables me to find an open Handicap-signed spot. Otherwise, there was not an empty parking place anywhere in the close lot. By the time I reached the front door, there was a line. Once in the museum, I found at least 50 people had already entered ahead of me. The crowd was a mixture of race, gender, and age. People brought their children: babes in strollers, elementary school age, pre-teens, and teenagers. This was a family event, a community event, an all-of-us event. Continue reading Everyday Black Exhibit Asks “Do You See Me Now?”

The “Baby-making” Novelist Bringing the “Grown and Sexy” to Seattle’s Book Scene

by Emerald Staff

If “Let’s Get It On” era Marvin Gaye had traded in his tenor for a pen, he’d probably craft novels similar to the South End’s Alvin “LA” Horn.

The multi-award winning novelist’s book catalog evokes sensuality, eroticism, and poignancy, with tales of forbidden romances, resilient relationships, and character transformations. Continue reading The “Baby-making” Novelist Bringing the “Grown and Sexy” to Seattle’s Book Scene

For the Love of Frank Castle: Fearlessly Black’s Review of Marvel’s The Punisher

by Hodan Hassan

What is it to be a hero? Is it only about saving people, or is it about saving people while trying to save yourself from your past or your demons? Jon Bernthal’s performance as Frank Castle is like no hero I’ve ever seen before. He’s dark, tragic, and belligerent. Continue reading For the Love of Frank Castle: Fearlessly Black’s Review of Marvel’s The Punisher

Artist Creates Idyllic “Beacon Hill Sunset” for Giant Mural

by Gus Marshall

A picture is worth a thousand words. Originally a Chinese proverb, later appropriated by the American advertising industry during the turn of the century to promote the use of visuals in advertising, the concept posits that a highly detailed idea can be conveyed more accurately with one single image in comparison to any amount of expressive imagery or highly descriptive language. Continue reading Artist Creates Idyllic “Beacon Hill Sunset” for Giant Mural

“Out & Transgender”: An Interview With Poet/Educator Finn Menzies

by Finn Menzies

Earlier this week, the Trump administration told the Centers of Disease Control to avoid using a menu of words including, “vulnerable,” “entitlement,” “diversity,” “transgender,” “fetus,” “evidence-based” and “science-based.”

As a man of trans experience, I already knew that my country wanted me to stop talking about and writing about being trans. The difference now is the silencing has become Washington-Official. But, I will never stop speaking and writing about my experience. After-all, all writing is about the human experience, and being transgender is just another story in the great river of human stories.  Continue reading “Out & Transgender”: An Interview With Poet/Educator Finn Menzies