Category Archives: Social Justice

Breaking Down Stigmas On Homelessness One Conversation at a Time

by Kelsey Hamlin

I was already going to be late for my morning class at the University of Washington, so I figured I might as well grab a coffee on my way, thinking ten more minutes of tardiness wasn’t going to do much more damage. Walking into my 20 person class unprepared, however, I realized I was wrong. We had guest speakers. Homeless guest speakers. I looked down at my green-labeled coffee and thought, yet again, how privileged I am. That money could’ve gone elsewhere. Continue reading Breaking Down Stigmas On Homelessness One Conversation at a Time

Students Tell Seattle School Board Ethnic Studies Needed

by Reagan Jackson 

(This article was originally published on the Seattle Globalist and has been reprinted with permission)

Sukino Keo, a student at Rainier Beach High School, laid out the need for K-12 Ethnic Studies to the board of the Seattle Public Schools.

“As a school with students of color majority it is important that we see ourselves represented in the materials we learn,” Keo said. “When the only history available for us to learn is of the European and white focuses, we are being told that the histories of our own people do not matter as much.” Continue reading Students Tell Seattle School Board Ethnic Studies Needed

An Interview With Homelessness Consultant Barb Poppe

by Erica C Barnett

(This article was originally published on The C is for Crank and has been reprinted with permission)

Last week, Mayor Ed Murray announced a $275 million levy to address the city’s homelessness crisis that emphasizes temporary housing vouchers on the private market, rather than more-intensive strategies like service-rich transitional housing, to get people off the streets and on their feet. The levy also funds some mental-health and drug treatment services, which Murray noted are “new lines of business” for the city. Continue reading An Interview With Homelessness Consultant Barb Poppe

“When We Unite and Fight, We Can Win”: An Interview with Beyond $15 Author Jonathan Rosenblum

by Cliff Cawthon

The Fight for Fifteen has become a common rally cry for economic justice these days but it has its roots in 2013 in the airport town of Seatac in South King County. One of that campaign’s directors, Jonathan Rosenblum has written a book about that disruptive moment in the U.S. labor movement’s relationship with capital, “Beyond $15:  Immigrant Workers, Faith Activists and the Revival of the Labor Movement.” Continue reading “When We Unite and Fight, We Can Win”: An Interview with Beyond $15 Author Jonathan Rosenblum

Womxn’s Rally Highlights Intersectionality, Sustained Resistance

by Sharayah Lane

Just days after the White House revealed its repeal and replacement plans for the Affordable Care Act thousands of women across the country participated in a mass act of civil disobedience in observance International Women’s Day. In Seattle, hundreds gathered downtown at Westlake Park despite a rainy Wednesday evening. Continue reading Womxn’s Rally Highlights Intersectionality, Sustained Resistance

Seattle University Moves Toward Fossil Fuel Divestment Despite President’s Lukewarm Response

by Nathalie Graham 

Over 462 universities have committed to or acted on fossil fuel divestment. With climate change and environmental injustices rearing their heads more and more each year, Seattle University’s Sustainable Student Action (SSA) is determined to get their school to divest. Continue reading Seattle University Moves Toward Fossil Fuel Divestment Despite President’s Lukewarm Response