Category Archives: Social Justice

Former Death Row Inmates Now Work to Abolish Death Penalty

by Susan Fried

Approximately 50 people gathered at the house of Barbara and Robert Rose-Leigh Sunday, October 1st for a reception to support the work of Witness to Innocence, a national organization composed of and led by exonerated death row survivors and their families whose mission is to abolish the death penalty.   Continue reading Former Death Row Inmates Now Work to Abolish Death Penalty

Vowing Support for DACA Recipients, Interfaith Coalition Says “No Human is Illegal”

by Susan Fried

On Sunday September 24, faith leaders from diverse religious traditions gathered for “No Human Being is Illegal An Interfaith Response Supporting DACA”  at Columbia City Church of Hope. Clergy members spoke about working together to support DACA recipients and undocumented people.   Continue reading Vowing Support for DACA Recipients, Interfaith Coalition Says “No Human is Illegal”

#NoNewYouthJail Movement Scores Legal Victory in Court of Appeals

by Kelsey Hamlin (Updated 9/26/17 at 4:58 pm)

The Court of Appeals handed prison abolitionist groups Ending the Prison Industrial Complex (EPIC) and #NoNewYouthJail (NNYJ) a substantial and calculated victory Tuesday morning that could potentially close the money spigot for the youth dentition center they’ve been opposing. Continue reading #NoNewYouthJail Movement Scores Legal Victory in Court of Appeals

“Our Best” Fails Black Girls: An Interview with Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw

by Erica C. Barnett

The story of the school-to-prison pipeline is a familiar one: Nationwide, young Black men in both public and private schools are more likely than their White counterparts to be disciplined, tracked into special education classes, and suspended for the same infractions, contributing to higher dropout rates and subsequent incarceration. Seattle is no exception to this nationwide phenomenon. In Seattle public schools, African-American boys are nearly three times as likely as White boys to be referred to special education, and fall far behind their White counterparts on nearly every standard measure of success—from third-grade reading scores, to seventh-grade math proficiency, to graduation rates. Continue reading “Our Best” Fails Black Girls: An Interview with Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw