Tag Archives: Art

Local artist draws connection between race and climate change

By Gus Marshall

South Seattle-based interdisciplinary visual artist Carol Rashawwna Williams explores the often-overlooked intersection of racial injustice and climate change. Her somber, monolithic prints slowly sway from the ceiling of Seattle University’s Hedreen Gallery, evoking a grave feeling of interconnected grief and pain. Williams’ current exhibit, “For the Record”, showing through Oct. 11, examines the stark similarities and disparities of two seemingly different issues: global warming and the lasting impacts of slavery.

Williams also serves as the Co-Executive Director of Community Arts Create (CAC), a nonprofit. CAC works to combat gentrification and the displacement of communities of color in the Hillman City area by building and strengthening relationships through community art programs and neighborhood engagement. The South Seattle Emerald spoke with Williams about her upcoming annual fundraiser for Community Arts Create, which will take place on Oct. 25 at the Hillman City Collaboratory.

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Framed in Harmony: Osa Elaiho mixes Faith, Family and Culture into Columbia City Gallery Exhibit

(This article was originally published in Real Change and has been reprinted with permission)

by Lisa Edge

When Osa Elaiho enters his studio in the early morning hours of the day, he begins with a routine before making a brush stroke on the canvas. First, he starts with a prayer. Next up is music to set the tone. His taste ranges from composer Antonio Vivaldi to Burna Boy, an Afro Fusion singer and songwriter who has two songs on the new “Lion King” soundtrack. Each chord fuels his ingenuity. His passion for music is as strong as his love for creativity.

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Central Area Home Reimagined as Haven for Black Art, Historic Preservation

by Georgia S. McDade
photos by Susan Fried

Do you remember Jordan’s Drug Store? Have you heard of Bluma’s Deli? Accent on Travel? Liberty Bank? Kirk’s Laundry? Black Arts West? Joy Unlimited? Thompson’s Point of View, Black and Tan, Miss Helen’s Diner? Tiki’s Tavern,? Mardi Gras? Red Apple? The list could be longer, but if you recognize these names, you know they are businesses gone from Seattle’s Central District or CD. Though reasons for their disappearances differ, the word “gentrification” enters conversations often. New buildings, several stories high, often in bright colors, dot the neighborhood. By the time this is printed, a few more landmarks may be gone or going. This is today’s CD.

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Simone Pin Productions Celebrates Diversity, Talent, and Thought-Provoking Artistry in ‘Queens’

by Becs Richards

Simone Pin Productions is much more than a dance company; they are dreaming of a new world. They are in the work of visioning for a more inclusive, sexy, editorial, and equitable creative space. Their upcoming performance, Queens, is a technical burlesque-based showcase of POC dancers, singers, and entrepreneurs premiering at Northwest Film Forum June 20.

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Columbia City Gallery Celebrates 20 Years

by Katie Pyontek

Columbia City Gallery smells, unsurprisingly, like oil paint. There’s a slight breeze in the gallery, and it’s quiet except for the air conditioner’s hum. An artist, one of the gallery’s current members, is working a shift in the gift shop and says hello. There’s an ease to being in the space.

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Artist Angelina Villalobos, aka 179, Infuses Her Art with Art, Culture, and Family

by Jessie McKenna

Angelina Villalobos, who goes by the moniker “179,” uses art to affect social change. Through drawing and painting, she explores her past and Latinx identity, dissecting elements of a traditional Mexican-Catholic education. She is consciously unlearning aspects of it, such as gender norms — issues, she said, “would do me harm and will ultimately hold me back.”

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Emerald Asks: What Are Your Favorite Murals in the South End?

by Emerald Staff

Murals are infused with meaning. More than decorations on a building’s exterior, murals represent and reflect the community. That’s why the Emerald asked readers this month: What are your favorite murals in the South End?

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Enter the Cabin and Peruse this Library of Black Lies at Henry Art Gallery

by Georgia S. McDade

When I saw Edgar Arceneaux’s installation — a large, wooden structure on display at Henry Art Gallery on University of Washington campus through June 2 — Abraham Lincoln’s log cabin came to mind immediately. Before I could digest, wonder, or analyze that thought, Donald Trump’s slatted fence came to mind.

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El Centro Unveils Bronze Bust of Martin Luther King Jr.

by Susan Fried

El Centro de la Raza to unveiled and dedicated a bust of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in Plaza Roberto Maestas on Feb. 1, the first day of Black History Month. The bust was a gift from the sculpture Jeff Day.

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Mount Baker Mural Washed Vast Sea Across Two Walls

by Steve Potter

Artists Ari Glass and Craig Cundiff have collaborated on a new mural near the Mt. Baker light rail station, and it’s a beauty. Covering the southern and western walls of Cash America Pawn at 2825 Rainier Ave. S., the artwork spans approximately 4,000 square feet and took about a month to paint.

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